AR 350-52 ARMY TRAINING SUPPORT SYSTEM

Army Regulation 350–52

Training

Army Training

Support

System

Headquarters

Department of the Army

Washington, DC 17 January 2014

UNCLASSIFIED

SUMMARY

AR 350–52

Army Training Support System

This new Department of the Army regulation, dated 17 January 2014-

o   Describes the Army Training Support System and its purpose and role in Armytraining (chap 1).

o   Assigns responsibilities for the Army Training Support System (chap 2).

o   Establishes a strategy for planning, programming, and prioritizing ArmyTraining Support System requirements and oversight (chap 4).

         Headquarters                                                                                                                          Army Regulation 350–52

Department of the Army Washington, DC

         17 January 2014                                                                                                                     Effective 17 February 2014

Training

Army Training Support System


H i s t o r y .  T h i s  p u b l i c a t i o n  i s  a  n e w

Department of the Army regulation.

S u m m a r y . T h i s r e g u l a t i o n d e f i n e s r e s p o n s i b i l i t i e s a n d p r e s c r i b e s p o l i c i e s o f

Army Training Support System programs on Army controlled installations to ensure that training support system resources are allocated properly to support the Army’s training strategies.

Applicability. This regulation applies to t h e a c t i v e A r m y , t h e A r m y N a t i o n a l

Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless otherwise stated. It also applies to Department of the Army civilian employees.

Proponent and exception authority. The proponent of this regulation is the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7. The proponent has the authority to approve exceptions or waivers to this regulation that a r e c o n s i s t e n t w i t h c o n t r o l l i n g l a w a n d regulations. The proponent may delegate this approval authority, in writing, to a d i v i s i o n c h i e f w i t h i n t h e p r o p o n e n t agency or its direct reporting unit or field operating agency, in the grade of colonel or the civilian equivalent. Activities may request a waiver to this regulation by prov i d i n g j u s t i f i c a t i o n t h a t i n c l u d e s a f u l l analysis of the expected benefits and must i n c l u d e f o r m a l r e v i e w b y t h e a c t i v i t y ’ s senior legal officer. All waiver requests will be endorsed by the commander or s e n i o r l e a d e r o f t h e r e q u e s t i n g a c t i v i t y and forwarded through their higher headquarters to the policy proponent. Refer to AR 25–30 for specific guidance.

Army internal control process. This regulation contains internal control provisions in accordance with AR 11–2 and identifies key internal controls that must be evaluated (see appendix B).

S u p p l e m e n t a t i o n . S u p p l e m e n t a t i o n o f this regulation and establishment of command and local forms are prohibited without prior approval from the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7), 1000 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–1000.

Suggested improvements. Users are invited to send comments and suggested improvements on DA Form 2028 (RecomBlank Forms) directly to the Headquart e r s , D e p a r t m e n t o f t h e A r m y , D e p u t y C h i e f  o f  S t a f f ,  G – 3 / 5 / 7  ( G – 3 7 / T R ) ( D A M O – T R S ) , 1 0 0 0 A r m y P e n t a g o n ,

Washington, DC 20310–1000.

Committee management. AR 15–1 requires the proponent to justify establishi n g / c o n t i n u i n g c o m m i t t e e ( s ) , c o o r d i n a t e draft publications, and coordinate changes in committee status with the U.S. Army Resources and Programs Agency, Department of the Army Committee Management Office (AARP–ZA), 9301 Chapek Road, Building 1458, Fort Belvoir, VA 22060–5527. Further, if it is determined t h a t a n e s t a b l i s h i n g “ g r o u p ” i d e n t i f i e d within this regulation, later takes on the characteristics of a committee, as found in the AR 15–1, then the proponent will foll o w a l l A R 1 5 – 1 r e q u i r e m e n t s f o r e s tablishing and continuing the group as a committee.

Distribution. This publication is available in electronic media only and is intended for command levels C, D, and E for the active Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve.


m e n d e d

C h a n g e s

t o

P u b l i c a t i o n s

a n d

Contents (Listed by paragraph and page number)

Chapter 1

Introduction, page 1

Section I

General, page 1

Purpose • 1–1, page 1

References • 1–2, page 1

Explanation of abbreviations and terms • 1–3,

page 1

 

 

 

AR 350–52 • 17 January 2014        i UNCLASSIFIED


Contents—Continued

Responsibilities • 1–4, page 1 Objectives • 1–5, page 1

Section II

Army Forces and Training, page 1

Army Campaign Plan • 1–5, page 1

Force structure • 1–6, page 1

Army force generation • 1–7, page 2

Army training • 1–8, page 2

Army Training Strategy • 1–9, page 2

Section III

Training Support System Overview, page 2 Training support • 1–10, page 2

Army Training Support System • 1–11, page 3

Chapter 2

Responsibilities, page 3

Deputy Undersecretary of the Army for Test and Evaluation • 2–1, page 3

Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs • 2–2, page 4

Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology • 2–3, page 4

Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment • 2–4, page 5

Deputy Chief of Staff, G–2 • 2–5, page 6

Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7 • 2–6, page 6

Deputy Chief of Staff, G–4 • 2–7, page 7

Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management • 2–8, page 7

Chief, National Guard Bureau • 2–9, page 8

Chief, Army Reserve • 2–10, page 8

Chief of Engineers • 2–11, page 8 Director, Army Safety • 2–12, page 8

Commander, U.S. Army Forces Command • 2–13, page 9

Commander, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command • 2–14, page 9

Commander, U.S. Army Materiel Command • 2–15, page 11

Commander, U.S. Army Central Command • 2–16, page 11

Commander, U.S. Army Europe • 2–17, page 12

Commander, U.S. Army North • 2–18, page 12 Commander, U.S. Army South • 2–19, page 12

Commander, U.S. Army Pacific • 2–20, page 12

Commander, U.S. Army Africa • 2–21, page 12

Commander, U.S. Army Special Operations Command • 2–22, page 13

Superintendent, United States Military Academy • 2–23, page 13

Commander, U.S. Army Installation Management Command • 2–24, page 13

Commander, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command • 2–25, page 13

U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command • 2–26, page 14 Commander, U.S. Army Medical Command • 2–27, page 14

Commander, U.S. Army Military District of Washington • 2–28, page 14 Chief, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers • 2–29, page 14

Chapter 3 Training Support System Program Components, page 15

Section I

Overview, page 15

General • 3–1, page 15

The Sustainable Range Program • 3–2, page 15

ii

Contents—Continued

The Mission Command Training Support Program • 3–3, page 15

The Soldier Training Support Program • 3–4, page 15

Combat Training Center Modernization • 3–5, page 16

Training Information Infrastructure Program • 3–6, page 16

Section II

Training Support System Metrics, page 16

Mission essential requirements • 3–7, page 16

Use cases • 3–8, page 16

Benchmarks • 3–9, page 16

Section III

Training Support System Products, page 17

Training Support System products • 3–10, page 17

Training aids • 3–11, page 17

Training devices • 3–12, page 17

Training simulators • 3–13, page 17

Training simulations • 3–14, page 17

The Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability • 3–15, page 17 Gaming for training • 3–16, page 18

Section IV

Training Support System Services and Facilities, page 18

Training information infrastructure • 3–17, page 18

Army Training Support System operations (services) • 3–18, page 18 Army Training Support System facilities • 3–19, page 19

Section V

Live, Virtual, Constructive Integration, page 19

General • 3–20, page 19

Live, virtual, constructive goals • 3–21, page 19

Training environments • 3–22, page 20

Live, Virtual, Constructive Integrated Training Environment Implementation • 3–23, page 20

Chapter 4

Training Support System Program Organization, Execution, and Management, page 20

Section I

Governance, page 20

Army Training Support System organization • 4–1, page 20

The Training Support System Enterprise • 4–2, page 21 Installation level command and control • 4–3, page 22

Section II

Program Execution, page 22

Execution commands • 4–4, page 22

Functional exceptions to execution command responsibilities • 4–5, page 22

Execution support commands • 4–6, page 23

Supported commands • 4–7, page 23

Training Support System execution on Joint bases and U.S. Air Force bases where Army units are stationed • 4–8, page 24

Section III

Training Support System Forums, page 24

Training General Officer Steering Committee • 4–9, page 24 Training Support Work Group • 4–10, page 24

iii

Contents—Continued

Training Support System Program Management Review meetings • 4–11, page 25

Combat Training Center quarterly reviews • 4–12, page 25

Training Support System modernization reviews • 4–13, page 25

Training Support System Theater IPR • 4–14, page 25 Training Support System Workshop • 4–15, page 25

Section IV

Requirements Generation, page 26

Training execution needs • 4–16, page 26

Training execution needs validation • 4–17, page 26

Requirements confirmation • 4–18, page 26

Training Combined Council of Colonels confirmation • 4–19, page 26

Training Support System Capability Assessment Forums • 4–20, page 27 Training Support System requirements drivers • 4–21, page 27

Section V

Management and Business Systems, page 27

Training Support System Master Plan • 4–22, page 27

Training Support Information Management System • 4–23, page 28

Training budget • 4–24, page 28

ITAM Plan and Work Plan • 4–25, page 28

Training Support-Materiel Armywide Tracking System • 4–26, page 28

Chapter 5 Training Support System Program Resources, page 29

Resource categories • 5–1, page 29

Planning, programming, budgeting and execution • 5–2, page 29

Management Decision Packages • 5–3, page 29 Program Evaluation Groups • 5–4, page 30

Appendixes

A.     References, page 31

B.     Training Support Center Operations, page 32

C.     Internal Control Evaluation, page 36

Table List

Table B–1: Installation support responsibility, page 33 Glossary

iv


Chapter 1

Introduction

Section I General

1–1. Purpose

This regulation defines responsibilities and prescribes policies of Army Training Support System (TSS) programs on Army controlled installations to ensure that TSS resources are allocated properly to support the Army’s training strategies.

1–2. References

Required and related publications and prescribed and referenced forms are listed in appendix A.

1–3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms

Abbreviations and special terms used in this regulation are explained in the glossary.

1–4. Responsibilities

Responsibilities are listed in chapter 2.

1–5. Objectives

This new regulation defines, provides guidance, and expands upon the TSS described in each Army regulation (AR) listed below—

a.    AR 350–1: Prescribes policies, procedures, and responsibilities for developing, managing, and conducting Army

training and leader development.

b.    AR 350–19: Assigns responsibilities and provides policy and guidance for—

(1)   Managing and operating Army ranges and training lands to support their long-term viability and utility to meetthe national defense mission.

(2)   Planning, programming, funding, and executing the Army’s range and training land programs.

(3)   Integrating program functions to support sustainable ranges.

(4)   Assessing range sustainability.

(5)   Managing the automated and manual systems that support sustainable ranges.

c. AR 350–38: Establishes Army policies and responsibilities for life cycle management of the areas listed below, but only as they pertain to training. It applies to capabilities acquired to meet urgent needs as well as acquisition programs.

(1)    Training aids, devices, simulators, and simulations (TADSS).

(2)    Tactical engagement simulations (TES).

(3)    Targetry.

(4)    Combat Training Centers (CTCs).

(5)    Gaming technologies.

(6)    Range instrumentation.

(7)    Training-unique ammunition.

d. AR 350–50: Describes the objectives and concepts of operations and establishes and prescribes Headquarters, Department of the Army (HQDA) responsibilities, policies, and planning guidance for the CTC Program.

Section II Army Forces and Training

The following Army strategic actions and documents are the basis of the Army’s TSS:

1–5. Army Campaign Plan

The Army Campaign Plan (ACP) provides direction for the detailed planning, preparation, and full execution of Army Transformation and Service, Title 10, United States Code (10 USC) activities necessary to provide relevant and ready land power to the Nation and to execute joint and expeditionary campaigns that protect our freedoms, deter our adversaries, and, if required, defeat our enemies.

1–6. Force structure

To meet requirements of current operations and anticipated future missions, the operating forces in all components of the Army are structured into operational headquarters (HQ) and modular units. These include armor, Stryker, and infantry brigade combat teams (BCTs) and support brigades (for example, aviation, maneuver enhancement, battlefield surveillance, fires, and sustainment).

1–7. Army force generation

The Army generates operationally ready units through a structured progression of training and mission preparation called Army force generation (ARFORGEN). Under ARFORGEN, a designated brigade increases readiness over time, moving through the reset, train/ready, and available force pools in the operational readiness cycle.

a.             Reset phase. During the reset phase, units stabilize personnel, receive new equipment, and conduct individual and some small unit and limited staff collective training. Units in reset phase are not typically available for operations.

b.             Train/ready phase. During the train/ready phase, active component and reserve component units conduct progressive, collective training to address the spectrum of conflict and mission essential task list (METL). Units identified for likely deployment refine their METL and conduct specific training to prepare for their operational mission.

c.             Available phase. During the available phase, units are in their planned-mission time windows and are available to deploy; conduct leader pre-deployment reconnaissance; deploy forces; execute reception, staging, onward movement, and integration; and assume an operation mission.

1–8. Army training

Army training supports ARFORGEN and focuses on the operational, institutional, and self-development training domains. Army training strategies, resourced by Deputy Chief of Staff (DCS), G–3/5/7, serve to synchronize the role each training domain plays in building force readiness.

a.    An operational or institutional mission commander (MC) is responsible for the training and readiness of his or her

leaders, Soldiers, and units.

b.    Operational training encompasses training activities that units and organizations undertake while training at home

station, at Maneuver CTCs, and while operationally deployed.

(1)          For Army units, training strategies for reaching and sustaining training proficiency (known as Combined ArmsTraining Strategies (CATS)) and weapons training strategies (known as Standards in Training Commission (STRAC)) establish training activities that determine associated training support.

(2)          Individual and collective (unit) training is performed by commanders with garrison support. Unit training is amission function and responsibility. MCs plan and execute the METL training required to build and sustain proficiency of their subordinate Soldiers, leaders, teams, and units in tasks essential for mission accomplishment.

c. Institutional training is a mission function and responsibility.

(1) Institutional training is performed by the One Army School System. This includes— (a) U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC).

(b)    U.S. Army Medical Command (MEDCOM).

(c)    U.S. Army Special Operations Command (USASOC).

(d)    U.S. Army National Guard (ARNG).

(e)    U.S. Army Reserve Command (USARC).

(f)     United States Military Academy (USMA).

(2)          Institutional training is executed through live instruction, distributed learning, or self-development to achieve andsustain required levels of individual basic combat skills, duty position military skills, functional skills, and professional development.

(3)          For schools, a program of instruction (POI) identifies the objectives and resources for each required trainingcourse.

(4)          Self-development is planned, goal-oriented learning that reinforces and expands the depth and breadth of anindividual’s knowledge base, self-awareness, and situational awareness. Self-development will complement what has been learned in the classroom and on the job, enhance professional competence, and help meet personal objectives.

1–9. Army Training Strategy

The Army Training Strategy is designed to generate cohesive, trained, and ready forces that can dominate at any point on the spectrum of conflicts. It describes the ends, ways, and means required to adapt Army training programs to an era of persistent conflict and to prepare units and leaders.

Section III Training Support System Overview

1–10. Training support

Army training is driven by the Army Training Strategy. The Army Training Strategy, as approved by the DCS, G–3/5/ 7 (G–37/TR), defines the objectives of the TSS. It directs the Army to deliver relevant live, virtual, constructive

(LVC), and gaming training enablers through the Army’s TSS products, services, and facilities. It directs the Army to create training conditions that realistically portray anticipated operational environments and institutional strategies reflected in the appropriate POI.

1–11. Army Training Support System

a. The TSS consists of five primary programs that complement each other and together generate the Army’s TSS capability through the delivery of products, services, and facilities. The programs include the Sustainable Range Program (SRP), Mission Command Training Support Program (MCTSP), CTC modernization, the Soldier Training and Support Program (STSP), and the Training Information Infrastructure Program. Each TSS program will be defined by supporting functions or components that may include program policy and procedures, manpower, and table of distribution and allowances structure, modernization strategy, operations support functions and resources, facilities, connectivity, and management support systems.

(1)          The SRP is the Army’s overall approach for improving the design, management, usage, and long-term sustainability of ranges. SRP is defined by its two core programs. The Range Program includes range modernization and range operations. The Training Land Program focuses on land management and maintenance through the integrated training area management (ITAM) process, training land acquisition, and SRP Outreach, which provides support to both SRP core programs. ITAM provides a Geographic Information System capability to support range modernization, range operations, and ITAM needs.

(2)          The MCTSP provides virtual, constructive, and gaming training environments in support of combined armstraining that replicates Army operations across the spectrum of conflict. This program supports mission command training for individuals and for units ranging from company to corps, and at levels from tactical to Joint task force, Army service component command (ASCC), and Joint Force Land Component Command. The MCTSP creates training that helps the Army’s leaders to develop current, relevant mission command instincts and skills. It supports Army Battle Command System training and mission command essential capabilities that empower individuals and small units and that allow junior leaders to prevail during decentralized operations. The MCTSP provides the staff and trainers, facilities, infrastructure, and other resources necessary to support mission command training of the U.S. Army, U.S. Army Reserve (USAR), and ARNG. The MCTSP includes mission training complex operations and facilities, virtual and constructive TADSS, Army gaming for training, and LVC integration.

(3)          The STSP includes individual Soldier through crew-level virtual and live TADSS, training support center (TSC),and virtual training facility operations. STSP manages TADSS production and fabrication of training devices, manages loan and issuance of TADSS, provides instructor/operator support for specific virtual TADSS, and other TADSS support that enables the MC to execute individual and collective training at installations and TRADOC schools. By county, installation areas of responsibility for training support centers are provided at appendix C and table C–1. (4) The CTC modernization provides modernization and life cycle technology refreshment of the Maneuver CTCs (National Training Center (NTC), Joint Readiness Training Center (JRTC), Joint Multinational Readiness Center (JMRC), and the exportable training capability) in support of Army Transformation. Modernization includes opposing forces (OPFOR), instrumentation, training aids, devices, simulators, and simulations (ITADSS), and facilities to provide a realistic training environment for BCTs in force-on-force and live fire scenarios. The CTC modernization ensures CTCs remain relevant by providing Joint context to the operational environment and provides the doctrinallybased feedback, facilitating leader and unit training dictated in the ARFORGEN training cycle. Resultant training capability output produces trained and ready combat units, leaders, and Soldiers prepared for the spectrum of conflict in a contemporary operational environment against a hybrid threat (wide area security/combined arms maneuver).

(5) The Training Information Infrastructure Program consists of two primary components—the Army Training Information System and point of delivery systems for distributed learning. Army Training Information System includes the integration of Army training information systems and provides an integrating architecture. Point of delivery systems for distributed learning maintain and upgrade these systems.

b.             The Army’s TSS provides management and sustainment of training support functions and programs worldwide, which supports Army training goals. TSS programs are managed through a series of venues as described in chapter 4.

c.             The TSS Enterprise is an established collaboration of organizations whose structure, governance systems, and

culture manage the Army TSS Program.

d.             Current TSS programs may be altered or expanded to support Army training strategies.

Chapter 2

Responsibilities

2–1. Deputy Undersecretary of the Army for Test and Evaluation

The Test and Evaluation Office Director coordinates with ASA (ALT) to provide overarching policies for implementing the TSS for Army test ranges. The Test and Evaluation Office with oversight policy authority designates the CG, Army Test and Evaluation Command (ATEC) to—

a.      Implement the TSS (ITAM only) at ATEC test ranges as a mission function and support implementation of the Army Sustainable Range Program per AR 350–19.

b.      Receive, distribute, manage, and monitor the obligation of ITAM funds at ATEC test centers.

c.      Provide representative(s) on appropriate boards and working groups to ensure a collaborative effort between the

training and testing communities.

d.      Represent the test range community at all program management reviews (PMRs) and other meetings and

conferences held to discuss relevant TSS issues.

2–2. Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs

The ASA (M&RA) is responsible for and has approval authority for all manpower policies in the Army and will— a. Approve training requirements and provide oversight and guidance that ensures capabilities and access to training

ranges, lands, and other live training facilities to support national security objectives.

b.      Oversee training requirements, personnel, training, and structural considerations required to support new materiel

systems. This oversight includes system and non-system TADSS.

c.      Coordinate with the DCS, G–1; DCS, G–3/5/7; Commanding General (CG), TRADOC; CG, Combined Arms Center (CAC); and Army Civilian University regarding development of DA Civilian Education and Leader Development Programs and requirements to support the Army Training and Leader Development Civilian Implementation Plan.

d.      Co-chair the Training PEG for the Army PPBE process.

2–3. Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics and Technology

The ASA (ALT) is responsible for conducting acquisition functions and acquisition management for the Department of the Army (DA). As such, the ASA (ALT) will—

a.    Provide policy and guidance to research, develop, and procure system and non-system TADSS and other

approved requirements for training support materials.

b.    Develop and defend ammunition procurement programs, including training ammunition.

c.    Ensure the Program Executive Office (PEO), Simulations, Training, and Instrumentation (STRI) will—

(1)          Provide responsive, interoperable simulation, training, testing solutions and acquisition services for the Soldiersand the Nation.

(2)          Provide, within the context of TSS, management of the Army’s technology initiatives in major instrumentationsystems, simulations, modeling, and training and will—

(a)          Acquire targetry devices to support training strategies and standards established by the TSS lead agents and combat developers (CBTDEVs).

(b)          Program and budget for the development and acquisition of range instrumentation and targetry.

(c)          Participate in target interface inspections that are conducted before installing targetry and related support equipment.

(d)          Coordinate programmatic logistics and supply support with the TSS lead agents for targetry and related support equipment.

(e)          Participate in SRP, STSP, MCTSP, and CTC modernization meetings and conferences.

(f)           Notify the Range and Training Land Program Center of Excellence of all technical requirements for targetry and range instrumentation.

(3)          Procure instrumentation and non-system TADSS to support Army-funded requirements and as agreed upon tosupport other funded requirements, when requested and funded by a weapon system program manager (PM), procure system TADSS.

(4)          Forecast, budget, and assist TRADOC with the documenting of TADSS requirements.

(5)          Forecast, budget, and provide for maintenance of non-system TADSS and system TADSS as agreed upon withthe system PEO/PM.

(6)          Forecast, budget, and provide for centralized maintenance (either contract or in-house) of Army MaterielCommand (AMC)-managed TADSS.

(7)          Acquire LVC integrated training environment (ITE).

(a)          Provides approved LVC integrated architecture common standards, hardware, software, and infrastructure for Army and Joint LVC simulations, simulators, and instrumentation.

(b)          Develops common interoperable components, such as multi-level security and after action review (AAR) systems.

d. Ensure the PEO, Enterprise Information Systems will—

(1)          Provide infrastructure and information management systems to the Army, in coordination with Chief InformationOfficer/G-6. PEO Enterprise Information System develops, acquires, and deploys tactical and management information technology systems and products.

(2)          Provide the Army training environment with information systems by developing, acquiring, integrating, deploying, and sustaining network-centric knowledge-based information technology and business management systems, communications and infrastructure solutions through leveraged commercial and enterprise capabilities.

(3)          Provide support for acquiring, fielding, and sustaining Army-based information systems that support the TSSprograms.

(a) ATIS Program. The ATIS Program is a formal governance and acquisition program that integrates and synchronizes existing and evolving training information system capabilities in five enterprise capabilities, to facilitate improved IT governance; net-centric sharing among training applications; and centralized access to all training systems and services. The five enterprise capabilities include the following:

1.    Training Enterprise Scheduling Capability

2.    Army Training Development Capability

3.    Army Learning Content Management Capability

4.    Army Training Management Capability

5.    Training Resource Management Capability

(b) Point of delivery infrastructure programs. Point of delivery programs include Digital Training Facility, Army National Guard Facilities (distance learning classrooms and mobile distance learning classroom), Digital Deployed Training Campus and Classroom XXI.

e. Ensure an assigned PEO and/or PM will—

(1) Plan and program resources for development, testing, fielding, and sustainment of all required system TADSS, embedded training, and training and/or distributed learning support products in accordance with the capability development document (CDD)/capability production document (CPD) and the system training plan. Execute new equipment training (NET) in accordance with the NET plan and the basis of issue (BOI) plan and/or fielding plan. Some examples of other PEOs include—

(a)    PEO Command, Control, and Communications Tactical.

(b)    PEO Intelligence Electronic Warfare & Sensors.

(c)    PEO Aviation.

(d)    PEO Integration.

(e)    PEO Missile and Space.

(2)          Plan and identify resource requirements for development, testing, fielding, and sustainment of all required nonsystem TADSS, embedded training, and training and/or distributed learning support products to execute and sustain institutional and operational training.

(3)          Provide hardware and software to the mission command system proponent schools, Combined Arms CenterTraining (CAC–T)/Collective Training Directorate to enable the validation of the NET products and begin development of institutional and self-development training material.

f.           Plan, program, and budget for systems and all system support (including training development, infrastructure upgrades, and integration of the system into fielded/developmental live, virtual, and constructive simulation and instrumentation systems) related to new or modified equipment acquisitions.

g.         Direct all PEOs to conduct concept formulation of all future system TADSS with PEO STRI on a reimbursable

basis, unless released of the requirement by the Army Acquisition Executive.

2–4. Assistant Secretary of the Army for Installations, Energy and Environment

a. The ASA (IE&E) is responsible for the following functions that contribute to an effective TSS capability:

(1) Installation real estate. The ASA (IE&E) will—

(a)   Establish and oversee implementation of policies for the accountability of Army controlled and/or managed military real property and interests therein.

(b)   Approve accountability reports of real property that are subject to the reporting requirements of the U.S.

Congress.

(c)   Approve or ratify exceptions to the policies regarding the accountability of real property.

(2)      Renewable energy development. The ASA (IE&E) will provide oversight and establish Army policy andguidance for operational energy; and interface with other Services, Office of the Secretary of Defense (OSD), and other agencies regarding operational energy issues.

(3)      Leases. The ASA (IE&E) will—

(a)   Establish and oversee implementation of policies for the accountability of Army controlled and/or managed military real property and interests therein.

(b)   Approve accountability reports of real property that are subject to the reporting requirements of the U.S.

Congress.

(c)   Approve or ratify exceptions to the policies regarding the accountability of real property.

(4)          Military construction (MILCON). The ASA (IE&E) will provide overall policy and program direction for Armyconstruction programs, including the Nonappropriated-Funded Construction Program.

(5)          Environment, safety, and occupational health. The ASA (IE&E) has primary responsibility for the Army’smilitary environmental programs.

(6)          The National Environmental Policy Act (42 USC 4321 through 42 USC 4347). The ASA (IE&E) has primaryresponsibility for the Army’s military environmental programs.

(7)          Army compatible use buffers. The ASA (IE&E) has primary responsibility for the Army’s military environmental programs.

b. The ASA (IE&E) co-chairs the Installation Program Evaluation Group (PEG) of the Army planning, programm i n g , b u d g e t i n g , a n d e x e c u t i o n ( P P B E ) p r o c e s s a n d s e r v e s a s t h e p r o p o n e n t f o r t h e A r m y S t r a t e g y f o r t h e

Environment.

2–5. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–2

The DCS, G–2 is responsible for the functional aspects of officer, warrant officer, enlisted, and civilian intelligence and counterintelligence specialist training per AR 350–1. The DCS, G–2 will—

a.    Provide policy related to institutional and force intelligence and security training, and OPFOR training in

accordance with AR 350–2.

b.    Provide oversight and functional management of the Foundry Program per AR 350–32.

2–6. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–3/5/7

a. The DCS, G–3/5/7 provides policy, resources, and prioritizes strategy for Army training standards, products, services, facilities requirements, and programs for Army training and leader development. The DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/ TR) will—

(1)          Serve as the HQDA director of the CTC Program and Army Staff (ARSTAF) focal point for all Army and/orJoint service CTC actions (see AR 350–50).

(2)          Ensure Army training resource requirements defined by Army training strategies are integrated so the Army cantrain to standard.

(3)          Serve as the ARSTAF proponent for the Army TSS Program. Specific responsibility for TSS programs willreside within DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR).

(4)          Formulate policies for planning, programming, operating, and managing ranges and training lands.

(5)          Program resources for range modernization and major training land acquisition projects determined to be a newmission requirement in accordance with AR 140–483.

(6)          Advise the Chief of Staff on Joint Interoperability Training programs.

(7)          Chair the STRAC and Training General Officer Steering Committee (TGOSC) in accordance with AR 350–1.

(8)          Serve as the focal point for force development, combat development, training development, resource management, and prioritization.

(9)          Approve Army command (ACOM)/ASCC/direct reporting unit (DRU) training ammunition requirements andpublish validated requirements in the Total Ammunition Management Information System.

(10)       Serve as the ARSTAF proponent for the Army Training Strategy.

(11)       Develop, coordinate, and provide oversight for Army ammunition requirements, both for training and warreserve.

(12)       Manage the Training PEG to ensure Army training resource requirements are effectively articulated anddefended during the program objective memorandum (POM) build.

(13)       Conduct and chair the Training Combined Council of Colonels (COC) and other forums, or delegate theresponsibility to the DCS, G–37/TR.

(14)       Prescribe policies governing war reserve, operational, training, and test munitions management and operatingprocedures for the Total Ammunition Management Information System.

b. The DCS, G–37/TR is the ARSTAF proponent for TSS responsible for policy development, resourcing, procedures, and management of the TSS programs (for example, SRP, MCTSP, CTC modernization, STSP, and Training Information Infrastructure), which support the Army Training Strategy, the ARFORGEN process, and enable the Army to support the National Military Strategy and as, such carries out the following responsibilities:

(1)    Formulates strategies, policies and procedures for planning, programming, operating, and managing the TSSprograms, products, services, and facilities.

(2)    Reviews and analyzes any Army or Joint training strategy or program for TSS implications.

(3)    Adapts TSS to support ARFORGEN.

(4)    Exercises approval authority for TSS needs and validates TSS requirements.

(5)    Prioritizes and integrates TSS requirements(6) Programs funds to support the TSS program. (a) Within the Training PEG.

(b)   In accordance with the PPBE process (see AR 1–1).

(c)   Through management of an applicable management decision package (MDEP).

(d)   By integrating TSS requirements into the overall Army infrastructure investment strategy in conjunction with the Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management (ACSIM).

(7)          Leads the TSS Enterprise consisting of DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) and U.S. Army CAC–T.

(8)          Co-chairs the training support work group (TSWG).

(9)          Chairs TSS Modernization Reviews bi-annually to address issues relative to the LVC and gaming systemsdevelopment and fielding.

(10)       Serves as a voting member of the working groups, configuration control boards, technical teams, and otherforums pertaining to the validation and prioritization of TSS requirements and issues.

(11)       Chairs PMR meetings and addresses all TSS program components with the respective ACOM, ASCC, andDRU TSS managers.

(12)       Provides direction to the TSS Enterprise entities, execution support commands, and supported commands.

(13)       Serves as the functional proponent for non-system TADSS and sets policy for management and operation ofmission training complex, Maneuver CTCs, and TSCs, except for policy governing the visual information functions that these centers perform.

(14)       Provides TSS management oversight of LVC TADSS fielding and support.

(15)       Identifies a requirements staff officer associated with non-system training device (NSTD) requirements.

(16)       Forwards approved requirements to ASA (ALT) so that they can be considered for acceptance into theAcquisition Management System.

(17)       Issues administrative programmatic guidance and instructions for implementing and sustaining the TSS programs within ACOMs, ASCCs, and DRUs.

(18)       Determines personnel resources required to support TSS programs and operations, operate and maintain TSSfacilities, and provide TSS services.

(19)       Coordinates matters affecting and/or related to the TSS and its programs with the ARSTAF, the ArmySecretariat, OSD, the Joint Staff, and appropriate Navy, Air Force, and Marine Corps commands.

(20)       Resources new mission requirements in accordance with existing project approval limits and processes (AR420–1 and AR 140–483).

(21)       Establishes priority of NSTD capabilities.

2–7. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–4

The DCS, G–4 will—

a. Maintain primary responsibility for maintenance, surveillance, storage, renovation, allocation, and distribution of ammunition, including training ammunition. Specific responsibility for ammunition issues related to sustainable ranges resides within the Munitions Division. The Munitions Division manages the Army’s operational and training ammunition stockpile assets, and serves as the proponent for munitions logistics. The DCS, G–4 will— (1) Develop and administer training ammunition distribution plans in support of authorizations.

(2)   Manage Army training ammunition assets using a life cycle approach.

(3)   Strive for common policies and procedures for training and operational ammunition.

(4)   Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

(5)   Exercise ARSTAF supervision over maintenance and logistics policies and procedures for TADSS and developintegrated logistics support policy and guidance for the development and/or procurement of TADSS.

b. Provide guidance to AMC for installation Directorate of Logistics functions.

2–8. Assistant Chief of Staff for Installation Management

The ACSIM will—

a.             Provide policy guidance, planning, and program management for installation management; MILCON; housing, sustainment, restoration, and maintenance (SRM), environmental stewardship, and sustainability to enable training strategies. Within the Office of the Assistant Chief of Staff of Installation Management, environmental programs, base operations (BASOPS), and real property management and planning responsibilities are carried out to support Army training and readiness per AR 200–1 and AR 420–1.

b.             Serve as the Commander, Installation Management Command (IMCOM). As the Commander, IMCOM and through coordination with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), provide support to ACOMs and installations that are developing facilities, training infrastructure, and other installation support requirements for unit set fielding by chairing the HQDA MILCON Integrated Product Team.

c.             Ensure facilities acquisition is integrated into and synchronized with materiel acquisition, in coordination with DCS, G–3/5/7; DCS, G–8; and Army Chief Information Officer, G–6 (CIO/G–6).

d.             Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

e.             Ensure ACSIM serves as the ARSTAF Environmental Program proponent. ACSIM will—

(1)          Manage environmental programs and ensures environmental programs, priorities, and activities enable the Armymission and supported tenants.

(2)          Recommend types and levels of environmental technical support and conservation related research and development by serving as co-chairs of technology teams and legacy project liaison.

(3)          Coordinate with technology developers to review, prioritize, design, develop, test, and/or validate the capabilitiesof new and/or existing environmental technologies applicable to ranges and training land, in cooperation with the SRP agent.

(4)          Coordinate internally and with ARSTAF elements, Secretariat, ACOM/ASCC/DRU, reserve component, andoperational units and activities to ensure environmental requirements are integrated into their programs.

2–9. Chief, National Guard Bureau

The Chief, National Guard Bureau will—

a.      Manage all TSS functions in and on ARNG installations, in conjunction with the Adjutants General of the States

and Territories.

b.      Serve as the HQDA adviser on TSS training and education matters for ARNG training and education.

c.      Recommend HQDA policy for training the ARNG.

d.      Coordinate with the TRADOC proponent the need for ARNG-unique TADSS to support specific ARNG CATS initiatives.

e.      Review TADSS requirements documents, BOI plans, distribution plans, and materiel fielding plans to ensure ARNG TADSS requirements are identified.

f.       Program funds to support procurement of ARNG-unique TADSS in support of approved ARNG CATS.

g.      Provide a prioritized TSS training needs list for the ARNG that is validated and adjudicated and present the

training needs list to the TSS enterprise during bi-annual PMR and TSWG conferences.

h.      Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

2–10. Chief, Army Reserve

The Chief, Army Reserve will—

a.      Serve as the HQDA adviser on USAR training and education material, and coordinate actions concerning units

through the Army component commanders that are responsible to train USAR units.

b.      Recommend HQDA policy for training the USAR.

c.      Coordinate with the TRADOC proponent, the need for USAR-unique TADSS to support specific USAR CATS initiatives.

d.      Review TADSS requirements documents, BOI plans, distribution plans, and materiel fielding plans to ensure USAR TADSS requirements are identified.

e.      Report TADSS on hand and monthly usage to their respective AR 5–9 regional active Army TSC.

f.       Program funds to support procurement of USAR-unique TADSS in support of approved USAR CATS.

g.      Manage all MCTSP functions at the USAR mission training complexes.

h.      Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

i.       See paragraph 2–13 for further responsibilities in his role as the Commander, USARC.

2–11. Chief of Engineers

The Chief of Engineers will—

a.      Exercise HQDA responsibility for engineer training and identify strategies and resources for engineer training.

b.      Exercise HQDA responsibility for functional aspects of officer, warrant officer, enlisted, and DA civilian engineer

specialist training.

c.      Develop and coordinate the Army’s position on Joint engineer training.

d.      Provide technical advice and assistance to the ARSTAF pertaining to facilities, military engineering, and geospa-

tial individual and unit training.

e.      Review the Logistics Support Plan for each TADSS program to ensure that all facilities requirements have been identified and defined. Review non-TADSS materiel end-item interfaces (for example, Embedded Training/Distributed Training) or other facility support requirements in coordination with materiel PEO/PMs per AR 700–127 through Materiel Release (AR 700–142). Assist with the development of the facilities support plan for each TADSS program.

f.       Review TADSS documents to ensure that military construction, Army (MCA) projects are identified.

g.      Validate TADSS support facility nominal cost as a component of materiel solution development and materiel

release.

h.      Draw, design, and assist with range development to support specific TADSS, the Army’s Range Modernization Program, and the CTCs.

2–12. Director, Army Safety

a. The Director, Army Safety, Office of the CSA, will—

(1)          Support ACOM/ASCC/DRU and CTC commanders in developing force protection (safety and fratricide avoidance) plans and programs.

(2)          Provide a means for expeditious reporting and correction of safety deficiencies.

(3)          Advise and evaluate composite risk management performance to ensure Army units are trained to protect theforce in training and operations.

b.             Direct the Range Safety Program (see AR 385–63 and DA Pam 385–63), which includes policies, procedures, and standards for firing ammunition, lasers, guided missiles, and rockets and guidance for composite risk management in range operations.

c.             Direct the Explosives Safety Program, which includes Armywide safety policies, responsibilities, standards, and

procedures for commanders with an ammunition and/or explosives mission.

d.             Ensure that specific responsibilities for issues related to TSS reside within the Army Safety Office. The Army Safety Office will—

(1)    Integrate range safety and composite risk management into Army range operations, policies, and procedures.

(2)    Identify and resolve range safety issues that affect Army training and readiness.

2–13. Commander, U.S. Army Forces Command

a. In its capacity as an ACOM, Forces Command (FORSCOM) trains, mobilizes, deploys, sustains, transforms, and r e c o n s t i t u t e s a s s i g n e d c o n v e n t i o n a l f o r c e s , p r o v i d i n g r e l e v a n t a n d r e a d y l a n d p o w e r t o c o m b a t a n t c o m m a n d s .

FORSCOM exercises administrative control of assigned forces through designated subordinate commands. In accordance with AR 525–29, FORSCOM is the Army’s manager for ARFORGEN the process by which the Army provides trained and ready conventional forces to combatant commanders. The Commander, FORSCOM will— (1) Command, operate, and maintain the JRTC and NTC per AR 350–50.

(2)          Provide a prioritized TSS training needs list based on major subordinate command lists, and validating andadjudicating for their command that is validated and adjudicated at Headquarters FORSCOM. FORSCOM will present their training needs list to the TSS Enterprise during bi-annual PMR and TSWG conferences.

(3)          Provide all required training materiel for JRTC and NTC operations, less fixed instrumentation and otherITADSS provided by ASA (ALT).

(4)          Publish command-specific CTC implementing regulations that address the policies, procedures, and requirementsfor training at the sponsored CTC.

(5)          Support implementation of the TSS per this regulation.

b. USARC is designated a Major Support Command of FORSCOM. The Chief, Army Reserve is dual-hatted as the CG, USARC and is supervised by the CSA and reports directly to the FORSCOM Commander. The Commander, USARC is responsible to the FORSCOM Commander for execution of assigned responsibilities.

(1)          USARC will provide a prioritized TSS training needs list for their command that is validated and adjudicatedand will present the training needs list to the TSS Enterprise during bi-annual PMR and TSWG meetings.

(2)          USARC executes TSS functions on local training areas operated by the USARC regional support commands as amission activity.

(3)          The 75th Training Command, USARC operates mission training complexes through designated subordinateunits.

(4)          The Commander, USARC supports implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

2–14. Commander, U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

a.             TRADOC develops the Army’s Soldier and civilian leaders, and designs, develops, and integrates capabilities, concepts and doctrine in order to build an Army that is a versatile mix of adaptable and networked organizations.

b.             TRADOC Centers of Excellence and Schools provide proponency, oversee Training and Doctrine Command capability manager (TCM) development of requirements for system TADSS, and provide LVC and gaming integrated training support requirements for their schools and their operational Army proponent units.

c.             TRADOC is the Army’s training developer. TRADOC designates the lead agents for the TSS programs and is the core of TSS Enterprise support consisting of directorates assigned to CAC–T, including the Army Training Support Center (ATSC), listed subsequently. In that capacity, TRADOC assists DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) with policy development and dissemination; needs development, integration validation, and prioritization; resource allocations; and execution oversight and tasking Armywide.

d.             TRADOC, CAC has the primary mission of preparing the Army and its leaders for war. CAC provides Armywide leadership and supervision for leader development and professional military and civilian education; institutional and collective training; functional training; training support; mission command; doctrine; lessons learned; and other specified areas that the TRADOC Commander designates. All of these are focused towards making CAC a catalyst for change and the development of a relevant and ready ground force to support Joint, interagency, and multinational operations anywhere in the world.

e.             CAC–T will—

(1)          Assist HQDA in executing the TGOSC by appointing an administrative agent that, when requested by DCS, G3/5/7 (G–37/TR), provides administrative support and assists with the coordination and scheduling of the TGOSC.

(2)          Execute combat and training development functions as they pertain to the acquisition of TADSS to supportArmywide or unique requirements.

(3)          Assist HQDA with the management of TADSS requirements documentation, TADSS assets, range modernization, and range sustainment.

(4)          Direct TADSS proponents to develop and distribute stand-alone training support packages that enable the user tosustain TADSS operator, trainer, and maintainer skills.

(5)          TCMs identify program needs and support planning, programming, budgeting, development, acquisition, integration, and provision of TSS products aligned with each major TSS program.

(6)          Develops the STRAC for ammunition and controls the non-standard ammunition request and approvals.

(7)          Prepare requirements documents (initial capabilities document, CDD, and CPD) for Non-Systems TADSS inaccordance with the Joint Capabilities Integration and Development System (JCIDS) process. The requirements are to be approved prior to funding in the POM so that the program can be executed properly.

(8)          Review JCIDS documents and engages in the JCIDS process to ensure training equities are properly addressed.

f. Under the direction of TRADOC CAC, the deputy commander, CAC–T manages the identification, development, and resourcing of Army collective training requirements and the efforts to develop programs to train units and leaders and to conduct the full range of military operations in the contemporary operational environment. g. CAC–T’s essential TSS tasks are—

(1)    Oversee programs for collective training and training management.

(2)    Provide mission command training.

(3)    Develop requirements for LVC and gaming simulations.

(4)    Integrate LVC and gaming training environment requirements.

(5)    Manage Army CTC programs.

(6)    Provide air-ground operations training.

h. Also, under the direction of CAC–T—

(1) The CAC–T National Simulations Center (NSC) will serve as the lead agent with support from the Training Management Directorate for the MCTSP. This includes capability development of constructive simulations; constructive simulations support to training domains; LVC ITE; Gaming/scenario development; warfighter simulation verification, validation, and approval; and support to captains career course POI. CAC–T NSC includes— (a) Operations Division and Training Support Division; Fort Leavenworth, KS.

(b)    Air Systems Team; Fort Leavenworth, KS.

(c)    TCM-Gaming/Futures and Integration; Fort Leavenworth, KS.

(d)    TCM Constructive Training Environment; Fort Leavenworth, KS.

(e)    Logistics Exercises and Simulations Directorate; Fort Lee, VA.

(2) The TCM-Virtual Training Environment will perform as the Army’s centralized planner, manager, and integrator for all combat developments associated with virtual simulators, simulations, and other components of the virtual training environment. TCM-Virtual Training Environment comprises the— (a) Simulations Operations.

(b) Air Systems team.

(3) CAC ATSC will manage, plan, integrate, implement, and sustain specific TSS programs, products, services and facilities that support training across all training domains and TRADOC’s core missions. CAC ATSC serves as the HQDA lead agent for— (a) TSS Integration.

(b)    Graphic training aids management.

(c)    Fielded devices inventory and management.

(d)    SRP, including the range operations, range modernization and training land management programs. (e) STRAC.

(f)     TES Systems.

(g)    Devices Fabrication Program.

(4) Under the direction of ATSC—

(a)          The TCM-Live will serve as the TSS program lead agent for the SRP. TCM-Live serves as HQDA lead agent, staff proponent, and TCM for planning and execution of live training support programs. TCM-Live provides staff oversight for development of new and modified hardware systems as the CBTDEV for live training systems.

(b)          The Systems Training Integration and Devices Directorate (STIDD) will serve as the TSS program execution agent for the STSP. Per AR 350–38, STIDD serves as the DA lead agent for inventory and life-cycle management for fielded devices. STIDD integrates and documents STSP TADSS requirements and processes system training plans, and annual TSS Reviews with all TRADOC proponent schools and Centers of Excellence.

(c)          The Training Support Assistance and Integration Directorate (TSAID) will perform as the overall integrator of TSS. TSAID manages the TSS Master Plan and database, directs the TSS on-site network of training support representatives, and provides the analytical support capability for training effectiveness analysis and capabilities requirements assessment as required by the JCIDS.

(5) The Combat Training Center Directorate will—

(a)   Ensure that CTC program requirements and modernization are linked to a viable resourcing strategy and CTC mission for the future.

(b)   Integrate training issues across all CTCs.

(c)   Assist with programming and integrating of Department of Defense (DOD) Training Transformation and Joint national training capability initiatives into the CTC Program. Under the direction of TRADOC CAC (per AR 350–50), the Army’s designated “responsible official” for the CTC Program, CAC–T is responsible for developing requirements (research, development, test, and evaluation (RDT&E); other procurement, Army, operation and maintenance, Army; and MCA that support the modernization of the Maneuver CTCs (NTC, JRTC, JMRC) and MCTSP. These needs will be reviewed by the CTC COC and TGOSC, validated through the JCIDS process, approved as requirements by DCS, G–37, and then resourced through the appropriate TSS or MCA program.

(d)   Assess CTC requirements based on the CTC client needs, CTC capabilities, and doctrine.

(e)   Develop a CTC master plan for each POM cycle and update during mini-POM cycles.

(f)    Administer, validate, and integrate the CTC Program, CTC resources, and the CTC master plan.

(g)   Assist TCM-Live in the execution of combat and training development functions as they pertain to the acquisition to TADSS to support the CTC Program.

i.              TRADOC Project Office One Semi-Automated Forces; Fort Leavenworth, KS performs as the Army’s centralized planner, manager, and cross-domain integrator for all One Semi-Automated Forces simulation requirements and supports training, exercises and military operations (training), concepts and requirements (analysis), and research, development and acquisition (testing and experiments) for brigade and below simulations.

j.              The Training Management Directorate will develop and integrate Army combined arms training programs and unit training products. Training Management Directorate, in conjunction with proponent schools and TRADOC Centers of Excellence, develops the Army’s collective training standards and strategies; develops training programs to enable crews, teams, staffs, and units to conduct the full range of military operations; and develops and publishes guidance for the development of training products and training support products. Training Management Directorate will assist the Army’s training support program by identifying training gaps in current and future training support capabilities for home station and deployed training.

2–15. Commander, U.S. Army Materiel Command

The Commander, AMC with guidance from the DCS, G–4, is responsible for the management of the Army’s operational management of munitions and missiles. The Commander, AMC will—

a.      Provide integrated materiel life cycle management of systems and equipment in parternship with PEO/PMs,

excluding TADSS.

b.      Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

c.      Provide management of training equipment and weapon system fleets at TRADOC Service Schools through the Fleet Management Program and ensure the readiness of training fleets to support scheduled and on-demand training requirements.

d.      Operate Directorate of Logistics functions on IMCOM installations.

e.      The CG, AMC, Tank-automotive Life Cycle Management Command provides acquisition, contracting, and business advisory services for the Army Targetry System for selected TSS range systems. Within the context of TSS, Tank-automotive Life Cycle Management Command is the materiel developer for selected ranges and will provide materiel readiness for the Army in the areas of technology support, materiel development, and logistics power projection. CG, AMC, Tank-automotive Life Cycle Management Command will—

(1)   Acquire targetry devices to support training strategies and standards established by the TSS lead agents.

(2)   Participate in Target Interface Infrastructure that is conducted before installing targetry and related supportequipment.

(3)   Coordinate programmatic logistics and supply support with the TSS lead agent for targetry and related supportequipment.

(4)   Participate in TSS meetings and conferences.

(5)   Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

2–16. Commander, U.S. Army Central Command

The Commander, ARCENT will—

a.    Execute TSS within U.S. Central Command area of responsibility (AOR) and coordinate with the TSS Enterprise.

b.    Integrate and prioritize TSS training needs and present them to the TSS Enterprise through the bi-annual TSS

PMR and TSWG.

c.    Execute the MCTSP at Shaw Air Force Base (AFB), SC.

2–17. Commander, U.S. Army Europe

The Commander, USAREUR will—

a.      Execute TSS within Europe and coordinate with the TSS Enterprise.

b.      Integrate and prioritize TSS training needs and present them to the TSS Enterprise through the bi-annual TSS

PMR and TSWG.

c.      Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

d.      Command, operate, and maintain the JMRC in accordance with AR 350–50.

e.      Provide all required material for JMRC operations, less fixed instrumentation and other ITADSS provided by ASA (ALT).

f.       Publish ASCC-specific CTC implementing regulations addressing the policies, procedures, and requirements for

training at the JMRC.

2–18. Commander, U.S. Army North

The Commander, U.S. Army North will—

a.    Provide a prioritized TSS training needs list for the integration and prioritization of of TSS training needs, and

will present the training needs list to the TSS Enterprise during bi-annual PMR and TSWG conferences.

b.    Submit MCTSP input to MEDCOM. Submit SRP and STSP input to IMCOM. As senior commander, establish

the overall TSS priorities at Fort Sam Houston, TX.

2–19. Commander, U.S. Army South

The Commander, USARSO will—

a.         Provide a prioritized TSS training needs list for their command that is validated and adjudicated and will present

the training needs list to the TSS Enterprise during bi-annual PMR and TSWG conferences.

b.         MEDCOM executes the MCTSP at Fort Sam Houston, TX and supports USARSO mission command training at Fort Sam Houston. USARSO, as an ASCC, submits SRP and STSP input to MEDCOM but does both in coordination with U.S. Army North as the senior commander for Fort Sam Houston, TX.

2–20. Commander, U.S. Army Pacific

The Commander, USARPAC will—

a.             Develop policies, procedures, resource requirements, and priorities for management and execution of TSS programs and associated assets (personnel, funding, facilities, equipment, systems devices, simulations, and simulators) within the Pacific Theatre.

b.             Eighth U.S. Army (EUSA) executes TSS functions as directed by USARPAC through the Training Support Activity Korea, assigned to EUSA and operational control to G–3, Training and Exercise, EUSA. Command relationships on the Korean Peninsula remain unchanged, with EUSA assigned to Pacific Command, operational control to United States Forces Korea and administrative control to USARPAC. The Regional TSS Integration function for the Korean Peninsula will be performed by the Chief, Training Support Activity Korea and funded from the Training Support Activity Korea TSAM account.

c.             USARPAC integrates and prioritizes TSS training needs and presents them to the TSS Enterprise through the biannual TSS PMR and TSWG.

d.             USARPAC executes TSS in accordance with this regulation and will—

(1)          Command, operate, and maintain the Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Capability.

(2)          Provide guidance, procedures, standards, direction, facilities, infrastructure, all required material and otherresources for Joint Pacific Multinational Readiness Capability operations, including Army games for training, and LVC integration.

(3)          Achieve the end state of train up to BCTs with a fully integrated Joint and Multinational hybrid (fixed site andexportable) Pacific high fidelity, fully instrumented training capability. This capability will greatly enhance regional home station training and training opportunities with regional partner armies.

2–21. Commander, U.S. Army Africa

U.S. Army Africa is an operational level Army force designated by the SA as the ASCC of U.S. Army Africa Command (AFRICOM). The Commander, U.S. Army Africa reports to the Commander, AFRICOM for operational and Joint training matters, and other matters for which AFRICOM is responsible. The Commander, U.S. Army Africa will—

a.    Provide continuous oversight and control of Army operations throughout the AFRICOM AOR.

b.    Execute TSS in coordination with USAREUR.

c.    Execute the MCTSP at Vicenza, Italy.

2–22. Commander, U.S. Army Special Operations Command

Commander, USASOC will—

a.      Oversee and evaluate training of ARNG special operations forces in continental United States (CONUS) and ensure that units are organized to accomplish special operations missions and support appropriate operational plans.

b.      Serves as the functional proponent for institutional training and doctrine for Army Special Forces, Civil Affairs,

and Psychological Operations.

c.      Provide a prioritized TSS training needs list for their command that is validated and adjudicated and will present

the training needs list to the TSS Enterprise twice a year at the PMR and TSWG meetings.

d.      Manage and operate the USASOC mission training complex at Fort Bragg, NC.

e.      Be responsible for an Army Service School, U.S. Army John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center. As such, it

performs all proponent functions in accordance with AR 350–1.

f.       USASOC will support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

2–23. Superintendent, United States Military Academy

USMA will—

a.    Provide a prioritized TSS training needs list for their command that is validated and adjudicated and will present

the training needs list to the TSS Enterprise during bi-annual PMR and TSWG conferences.

b.    Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

2–24. Commander, U.S. Army Installation Management Command

The Commander, IMCOM will—

a.      Direct and execute installation management and the TSS programs at CONUS active Army and USAR mission

locations to support senior commanders, TSS needs, and priorities.

b.      Collect and present installation senior commanders’ TSS needs, priorities, and issues to the TSS Enterprise at PMRs and to the TSWG.

c.      Execute the TSS programs in accordance with the DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) resource allocations and directions in CONUS, and ensure that TSS program resources are provided directly to installations.

d.      Provide guidance, procedures, standards, and direction for standard BASOPS services in areas directly supporting

the TSS programs.

e.      Provide SRM for TSS real property facilities.

f.       Coordinate and prioritize standard BASOPS services, which support the TSS programs, to include logistics

functions performed by AMC on Army installations.

g.      Maintain program coordination with TSS program agencies and ACOMs related to environmental, facility

management and funding issues impacting ranges and training readiness.

h.      Provide technical expertise to the installations, MCs, and ACOMs.

i.       Coordinate with the DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) SRP program leads on all range, training land, and associated

environmental issues.

j.       Provide representatives to participate in PMR meetings.

k.      Assign garrison staff that will provide management and technical support to TSS.

l.       Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

m.    The Commander, U.S. Army Environmental Center (USAEC), provides environmental technical support to the

DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) for the SRP. USAEC will—

(1)          Provide and manage National Environmental Policy Act programmatic support for range modernization.

(2)          Develop and maintain tools to support analysis of encroachment and environmental impacts on training andreadiness.

(3)          Recommend environmental technology and research applications, tools, best management practices, and mitigation strategies to sustain the capability of ranges to reduce the impact of training in the areas of unexploded ordnance and munitions constituents, conservation, cultural resources, and other compliance areas.

2–25. Commander, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command

The Commander, U.S. Army Intelligence and Security Command is the Program Administrator for the Foundry

Program per AR 350–32. As the Program Administrator, Intelligence and Security Command will—

a.      Recommend TADSS available through non-DOD sources that have Foundry Program application.

b.      Advise and assist the CG, TRADOC and other ACOMs on issues of development, procurement, and maintenance of Foundry Program-related TADSS.

c.      Define OPFOR training instrumentation system requirements in support of the CTCs.

2–26. U.S. Army Test and Evaluation Command

ATEC is designated as a DRU by the SA and reports directly to the CSA. The ATEC plans, integrates, and conducts experiments, developmental testing, independent operational testing, and independent evaluations and assessments to provide essential information to acquisition decision makers and commanders. ATEC does not have an official training mission and supports individual developmental training per Department of Defense directive (DODD) 3200.11. The level of support is at the discretion of the HQ, ATEC CG. All support provided by the individual ATEC Test Centers is on a 100 percent reimbursable basis from the using activity.

a.      The only TSS function relevant to ATEC is the ITAM Program. ATEC’s, ITAM Program funding is limited to

the test ranges and centers listed in this regulation.

b.      ITAM funding is provided directly from the Army Budget Office to HQ, ATEC in accordance with DCS, G–3/5/ 7 (G–37/TR) funding guidance. HQ, ATEC will distribute the received funding in accordance with the current fiscal year (FY) ITAM plan. ATEC will integrate and prioritize TSS training needs and present them to the TSS Enterprise at the bi-annual TSS PMR and TSWG.

c.      ATEC will support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

2–27. Commander, U.S. Army Medical Command

MEDCOM is designated as a DRU by the SA. MEDCOM provides medical, dental, and veterinary capabilities to the Army and designated DOD activities; operates fixed facilities; conducts medical research, materiel development and acquisition; educates and trains personnel; provides Class VIII supplies to MEDCOM simulations, and develops medical concepts, doctrine, and systems to support Army healthcare delivery.

a.    MEDCOM trains the medical force, develops medical doctrine and future concepts; conducts combat develop-

ments; develops training devices, simulations, and publications; and manages medical force structure.

b.    MEDCOM maintains the following relationships:

(1)          Coordinates with TRADOC on medical combat development functions, doctrinal concepts, and systems forhealth services support to the Army in the field.

(2)          Supervises and evaluates the performance of Army Medical Department reserve component units when trainingwith MEDCOM activities.

(3)          Administers the individual medical training programs for reserve component personnel performing advancedindividual training at MEDCOM activities.

c.    MEDCOM is responsible for an Army Service School, the Army Medical and Dental Center and School. As such,

it performs all proponent functions per AR 10–87.

d.    Commander, MEDCOM will—

(1)          Provide a prioritized TSS training needs list for their command that is validated and adjudicated and will presentthe training needs list to the TSS Enterprise during bi-annual PMR and TSWG conferences. MEDCOM, as a DRU, submits SRP and STSP input to IMCOM and MCTSP input to TRADOC (NSC, CAC–T) but does so in coordination with U.S. Army North as the senior commander for Fort Sam Houston, TX.

(2)          Execute the MCTSP as part of the Army Medical Department Center and School and support U.S. Army Northand USARSO mission command training at Fort Sam Houston, TX.

(3)          Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

2–28. Commander, U.S. Army Military District of Washington

Commander, MDW will—

a.    Provide a prioritized TSS training needs list for their command that is validated and adjudicated and will present

the training needs list to the TSS Enterprise during bi-annual PMR and TSWG conferences.

b.    Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

2–29. Chief, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Within the context of TSS, the USACE will—

a.      Execute the MCA-funded MILCON Program, including design and construction of training facilities for the Army.

b.      Ensure that resource requirements to support the TSS are included in the HQ USACE POM submission to HQDA G–37/TR.

c.      Provide RDT&E support and enhanced science and engineering research, technology development, and applica-

tion to support the TSS.

d.      Provide spatial data standards and support through the Army Geospatial Center.

e.      Coordinate directly with the SRP, MCTSP, and STSP agents and assist DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) in developing Army training investment strategies and program objectives.

f.       Ensure that all planning documentation and actions necessary to implement real estate acquisitions are met.

g.      Manage development and implementation of SRP facility standardization of DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR)-funded MILCON activities to include MCA project scope and cost validation per AR 420–1. Support the TSS lead agents’ planning charrettes for DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR)-funded range, mission command, and STSP projects.

h.      Provide centralized support for preparation, review, and validation of MILCON DD Form 1391 (FY, Military Construction Project Data) and DD Form 1390 (Military Construction Program) for TSS projects before those projects are included in the MILCON Program.

i.       Provide technical consulting services to USACE districts during design and construction of TSS MILCON projects.

j.       Advise DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) when the application of design guidance does not appear to support training

requirements.

k.      Advise DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) on range and training lands, and support facility engineering and design

requirements, during the development of force modernization and new weapons systems initiatives.

l.       Assist DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) with the development of TSS MILCON project cost data.

m.    Support implementation of the TSS in accordance with this regulation.

Chapter 3 Training Support System Program Components

Section I Overview

3–1. General

The TSS includes five major programs that provide holistic development and delivery of training products, services and facilities to executors. The core TSS programs are the SRP, MCTSP, CTC modernization, STSP, and the Training Information Infrastructure Program.

3–2. The Sustainable Range Program

a. The SRP is the Army’s overall approach for improving the design, management, usage, and long-term sus-

tainability of ranges. The SRP is defined by its two core programs—

(1)      The Range Program, which includes range modernization and range operations.

(2)      The Training Land Program, which focuses on land management and maintenance through the ITAM process,training land acquisition, and SRP Outreach.

b. The goal of the SRP is to maximize the capability, availability, and accessibility of ranges and training lands to support doctrinally based operational and institutional training requirements, mobilization, and deployments under normal and surge conditions. Within the SRP—

(1)          Capability refers to the SRP core programs (the Range Program and the Training Land Program) and thecontinuing capacity of ranges to meet the demands dictated by the ACP, as well as characteristics of Army weapons systems, doctrine and tactics, techniques, and procedures requirements.

(2)          Availability refers to the non-environmental facility management functions and the continuous availability of theinfrastructure that is essential to safe operation of Army range complexes.

(3)          Accessibility refers to the environmental compliance and management functions and the continuous access to theland for realistic military training and testing.

3–3. The Mission Command Training Support Program

a.      The MCTSP provides a training environment in support of combined arms training. The MCTSP replicates Joint, interagency, intergovernmental, multinational operations in a full spectrum contemporary operational environment, at worldwide locations, in accordance with the ARFORGEN model. Army Senior MCs develop current, relevant, campaign quality, Joint and expeditionary mission command instincts and skills through MCTSP-generated training.

b.      The MCTSP provides mission command training (individual and collective), facilities, infrastructure, and other

resources in support of the active component and reserve component.

c.      MCTSP includes training centers’ operations and facilities, collective virtual and constructive TADSS and

facilities, Army games for training, and LVC integration.

3–4. The Soldier Training Support Program

a.    The STSP includes individual Soldier through crew level virtual and live TADSS, TSC, and virtual training

facility operations and facilities.

b.    The STSP manages TADSS production and fabrication of training devices, manages loan and issuance of TADSS, and provides instructor/operator support for specific virtual TADSS and other TADSS support that enables the MC to execute individual and collective training at installations and TRADOC schools.

c.    AR 350–38 establishes policy, procedures, and responsibilities for Armywide management of TADSS and the STSP. It includes TADSS management (infrastructure and maintenance) and fielded TADSS management (crossleveling between installation, obsolence, and disposal).

3–5. Combat Training Center Modernization

a. CTC modernization provides modernization and life cycle technology refreshment of the Maneuver CTCs in

support of Army Transformation. Modernization—

(1)      Includes OPFOR vehicles and command, control, communications, computers, and information (C4I), surveillance, and reconnaissance, ITADSS, and facilities to provide a realistic training environment for Army BCTs in forceon-force and live fire scenarios.

(2)      Ensures CTCs remain relevant by providing Joint context to the operational environment.

b.         Resultant training capability output produces trained and ready combat units, leaders, and Soldiers prepared for full spectrum operations in a contemporary operational environment against a hybrid threat (wide area security/ combined arms maneuver).

c.          AR 350–50 establishes policy, procedures, and responsibilities for Armywide management of the CTC Program.

3–6. Training Information Infrastructure Program

The Training Information Infrastructure Program provides the hardware, software, and communications systems, conforming to both Joint and Army architectures and standards that enable the development, storage, retrieval, delivery, and management of training information for use by individuals, units, and institutions worldwide. Training Information Infrastructure consists of two major components—Army Training Information System and point of delivery systems for distributed learning.

Section II Training Support System Metrics

3–7. Mission essential requirements

a. The TSS Enterprise establishes and maintains Army TSS mission essential requirements (MERs) by TSS

program.

(1)          TSS MER include the proponent-developed quantity, based on the proponent-developed BOI plan or quantity,based on the approved supporting strategy of each training enabler required by a unit type.

(2)          Installation MERs represent the TSS capabilities required to support unit training strategies at a specificinstallation.

b.             The MERs include the minimum number of LVC TADSS, training ranges and facilities, and training operation support personnel (for example, manpower) required to enable and support individual and collective maneuver and live fire, leader, and staff training.

c.             The MERs account for and documents selected training enabler requirements by installation for the STSP, SRP, and MCTSP.

d.             The MER compare proponent-established metrics against on-hand inventories to determine program shortfalls and

to support the prioritization and POM processes.

3–8. Use cases

Use cases describe the scope and level of the TSS capability required for each program, by levels of installations, based on training missions of these installations. Each program uses a unique set of metrics to define the level of capability required and is associated with size of the individual TSS program (for example, tiers for ranges and categories for ITAM; large/medium/small capacity for STSP and MCTSP). MCTSP uses hub and spoke to refine and/ or limit the amount at small capacity between mission training complex locations.

3–9. Benchmarks

Benchmarks are used to track TSS assessments across the Future Year Defense Plan by program and reflect ACP decision points and milestones. Typically, the first benchmark is the current FY, the second benchmark is the first year of the POM, the third bench mark is the middle of the POM, and the last benchmark is the last year of the POM.

Section III Training Support System Products

3–10. Training Support System products

TSS products are the integrated, interoperable capabilities that enable the conduct of training. They consist of the Target Interface Infrastructure; TADSS, and other TSS sponsored training systems.

a.             The Target Interface Infrastructure includes hardware, software, and communications systems conforming to both Joint and Army architectures and standards that enable the development, storage, retrieval, delivery, and management of TSS products and information for use by individuals, units, and institutions worldwide.

b.             TADSS or ITADSS; TES; battle simulations; targetry; training-unique ammunition; drilled and inert munitions; casualty assessment systems; training aids; and other training support devices. All of these are subject to the public laws and regulatory guidance governing the acquisition of materiel. STSP Program, under the guidance of the local TSC, provides oversight of all TADSS used to support training in each TSS arena. TADSS are categorized as system and non-system.

(1)          System TADSS are designed for use with a system, family of systems, or item of equipment, includingsubassemblies and components. They may be stand-alone, embedded, or appended. Using system-embedded TADSS is the preferred approach where practical and cost effective. The Training PEG resources the maintenance of fielded Systems TADSS, but not their acquisition or life cycle sustainment.

(2)          Non-system TADSS are designed to support general military training and non-system-specific training requirements. The Training PEG plans and programs funds for the life cycle of NSTDs to include acquisition, fielding, sustainment, maintenance, and disposal.

c. Other training systems may be unique products or TADSS that enable training in a LVC training environment.

3–11. Training aids

Training aids are instructional aides that enable trainers to conduct and sustain task-based training in lieu of using extensive printed material or equipment. Examples of training aids include—

a.    Visual modification sets.

b.    Graphic training aids.

c.    Models.

d.    Displays.

3–12. Training devices

Training devices are three-dimensional objects and associated computer software that are developed, fabricated, stand alone, embedded, and appended and procured specifically for improving the learning process. They are categorized as either system or non-system devices and usually support the live training environment.

3–13. Training simulators

Training simulators are devices, computer programs, or systems that perform simulation. For training, they are devices that duplicate the essential features of a task situation and provide for direct practice. They are also physical models, mock-ups, or simulations of a weapons system, set of weapons systems, or piece of equipment that endeavors to replicate some major aspect of the equipment’s operation, which usually supports the virtual environment.

3–14. Training simulations

Training simulations are a method for implementing a model(s) over time; any representation or imitation of reality, including environment, facilities, equipment, mechanical and maneuver operations, motion, role playing, leadership, and so forth. They are the representation of salient features, operations, or environment of a system, subsystem, or scenario that usually supports the constructive environment.

3–15. The Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability

a. The Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability is a constructive software modeling and simulation capability that contributes to the Joint training functional concept and the Army training mission area by providing the appropriate levels of fidelity to support both Army and Joint training requirements. The Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability is comprised of two separate federations, Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability Multi-resolution Federation and Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability Entityresolution Federation.

(1)          The Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability Multi-resolution Federation is a federation ofsimulations, simulation C4I, C4I interfaces, data collection, and AAR tools supported by commercial software and commercial off-the-shelf hardware. It is designed to train commanders and battle staffs at division and above echelons that will support training of commanders and their staffs in maneuver, logistics, intelligence, air defense, and artillery. It provides the commander and staff with information to stimulate the decisionmaking process.

(2)          Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability Entity-resolution Federation is a federation of simulations, simulation C4I interfaces, data collection and AAR tools. It stimulates the Army Mission Command System to facilitate battle staff collective training by requiring staff reaction to incoming digital information, while executing the commander’s tactical plan. The targeted training audience is comprised of brigade and battalion battle staffs, functional command post training and full command post training. Battle staffs of higher echelons may also employ Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability Entity-resolution Federation to achieve specific training objectives.

b.      The federate models are connected by a combination of the standard High-Level Architecture Run-Time In-

frastructure, Distributed Interactive Simulation, custom interfaces, the master interface and point-to-point.

c.      The Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability provides the simulated operational environment in which computer-generated forces stimulate and respond to the command and control processes of the commanders and staffs. The Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability models will provide full training functionality for leader and battle staff for the Army and the Joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multinational spectrum.

d.      The Joint Land Component Constructive Training Capability provides an interface to the Army Mission Com-

mand System equipment allowing commanders and their staffs to train with their "go-to-war" systems.

3–16. Gaming for training

Gaming for training addresses the need to augment and improve individual, collective, and multi-echelon training by filling training capability gaps caused by complementing live, virtual and constructive TADSS. Gaming will provide a toolkit of capabilities that draws from various applications, genres, and programs from which commanders will select capabilities that augment and improve their existing training capabilities or fill gaps in their training.

Section IV Training Support System Services and Facilities

3–17. Training information infrastructure

a.         The Training Information Infrastructure consists of point of delivery infrastructure for distributed learning.

b.         Training Information Infrastructure operates on, and with, the Army Enterprise Network (LandWarNet), providing a service- oriented architecture, standards, specifications, information assurance, and cloud computing to support training information technology functions.

c.          The Training Information Infrastructure also includes the Army Training Information System which provides a disciplined approach to training information technology investments for the Army. Army Training Information System provides transparent access to approved systems through a single point via an evolved Army Training and Education Network. Army Training Information System delivers functional solutions against capability gaps by integrating or investing in existing systems or investing in new systems.

d.         Under the Training Information Infrastructure Program, Army Training Information System integrates and

delivers training information technology that supports the following functions:

(1)    Training management.

(2)    Training delivery.

(3)    Training development.

(4)    Federated architecture.

3–18. Army Training Support System operations (services)

TSS operations (services) are the manpower, management, and support services that enable the preparation, distribution, and sustainment of training.

a.      Management support services are those efforts that support or contribute to improved program management and

sustainment for training programs.

b.      Acquisition support services are those efforts that support or contribute to improved contracting processes for

training products and services.

c.      Support services are those efforts that support or contribute to the improved conduct of training that are not

included in the management or acquisitions support services.

d.      Common levels of service and/or the standard garrison organization (SGO) define TSS services where IMCOM is the executing command. Common levels of service/SGO metrics provide guidance for defining TSS services in other executing commands.

(1)          Common levels of service is a strategy for performing IMCOM’s installation service management processes toachieve specific results-namely standardization of installation services, accountability for performance, and equitable distribution of available resources. A key tenet of the common levels of service strategy is to reduce variation in its installation services management processes at the HQ and garrison levels. Common levels of service is aligned to the

SGO.

(2)          The SGO establishes the structure for delivery of common levels of service by providing a garrison structurewith consistent functions, names, and processes across all installations and supplying a common platform to deliver services with common standards. SGO enables the Army to direct resources equitably across the garrisons, while r e a l i z i n g e f f i c i e n c i e s f r o m b e s t b u s i n e s s p r a c t i c e s , w h i c h c a n b e u n i f o r m l y i m p l e m e n t e d a s s t a n d a r d o p e r a t i n g procedures.

3–19. Army Training Support System facilities

Training facilities and land are the permanent or semi-permanent facilities, such as the ranges, maneuver training areas, classrooms, mission training complexes, CTCs, and land that supports training.

a.      Ranges are designated land or water areas that are set aside, managed, and used for range activities of the DOD. The term includes firing lines and positions, maneuver areas, firing lanes, test pads, detonation pads, impact areas, electronic scoring sites, buffer zones with restricted access, and exclusionary areas. The term also includes airspace areas designated for military use in accordance with regulations and procedures prescribed by the Administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration (10 USC 101(e)(1)(A) and (B)).

b.      Maneuver training areas are those required for land-intensive training at the installation and are further defined in

terms of the light and heavy forces that use them.

c.      Battle Simulations Centers are designated to support training in Army service schools, which make up the

generating force, and support delivery of learning content to the point of need.

d.      Mission training complexes are designated for individual and collective training on mission command systems

and battle staff procedures to build adaptive units at medium level of fidelity.

e.      TSCs are designated for the storage, management, maintenance, issuance, and receipt of TADSS.

f.       Simulation facilities are designated for the storage, maintenance and operations of motion and non-motion TADSS.

g.      Regional Simulation Centers are designated to support collective training of division and higher, medium to high

fidelity, construction command post exercises, and mission rehearsals.

h.      The Training Information Infrastructure Program provides a variety of enhanced standard classrooms and classroom systems used to distribute training and training information for the operational, institutional, and self-development domains to include Classroom XXI; Digital Training Facilities, and the Deployed Digital Training Campus.

Section V Live, Virtual, Constructive Integration

3–20. General

a. The state of Army training involves transforming training at the pace of technical change, which includes

improving LVC interoperability and integration through the creation of an LVC ITE.

(1)          The LVC ITE ensures LVC TADSS and embedded training systems are mutually compatible so that they cancommunicate with each other.

(2)          The LVC ITE will facilitate more realistic, effective, and efficient training and significantly reduce the cost ofeach exercise or mission planning and rehearsal drill.

(3)          The LVC ITE will allow commanders to train multiple scenarios, under various conditions, using progressivetraining phases.

(4)          The LVC ITE will be enabled by the LVC integrated architecture.

b.             The LVC integrated architecture is a network-centric linkage that collects, retrieves and exchanges data among live instrumentation, virtual simulators and constructive simulations as well as between Joint and Army Mission Command Systems. This architecture provides the common protocols, specifications, standards and interfaces that help standardize common LVC components and tools required for interoperability of LVC components for simulation/ stimulation of unit mission command systems for mission rehearsals and training.

c.             The Joint Requirements Oversight Council approved the LVC integrated architecture CPD as part of the JCIDS

process.

d.             The LVC integrated architecture acquisition will incrementally link the five LVC pillars: live environment, virtual environment, constructive environment, the installation’s training infrastructure, and mission command systems. The end state will be a training environment that seamlessly and realistically replicates operational environments at any point on the spectrum of conflict and in any operational theme to help develop agile leaders and units with full spectrum capabilities.

3–21. Live, virtual, constructive goals

a.             Commanders and their staffs must be able to conduct LVC training exercises and mission planning and rehearsals that are so realistic that they cannot tell if the information they are receiving is real or simulated. These integrated simulations will provide a capability by which commanders, units, and individuals can obtain information on demand from Army and Joint mission command systems and gaming tools.

b.             Commanders must be able to determine the right mix of LVC based on the training objectives and resource availability, yet not sacrifice training realism.

(1)          The combination of LVC training enablers will raise the proficiency level of units and reduce the time andresources required for live-only training.

(2)          This training environment will raise leader and unit proficiency, so they enter live training at a much higherlevel, thus saving time and other resources since they can achieve the standard more quickly.

c. The LVC integrated architecture and infrastructure will enable an LVC ITE that approximates the operating environment and provides more efficient and effective training and mission rehearsal capabilities for units, leaders, and staffs.

(1)          The LVC integrated architecture will enable increased readiness by allowing training over realistic distanceswith actual C4I, surveillance, and reconnaissance systems on theater terrain.

(2)          The LVC integrated architecture will enable increased Joint training by establishing links with the Joint trainingenvironment.

(3)          The LVC integrated architecture will decrease the overall cost to train by lessening the cost of contractors andtime to build an exercise and by leveraging all training opportunities.

3–22. Training environments

a.             The LVC ITE is a set of TADSS acquisition programs that facilitates data. The blended ITE is the collection of LVC capabilities on an installation used logically to support and enable operational and institutional training.

b.             The LVC ITE integrates the LVC training environments enabling commanders, units, and staffs to “train as they operate” across the full spectrum of conflict within the Joint and contemporary operational environment. LVC ITE consists of an installation’s training and operational network infrastructures that are linked by an integrating architecture which provides the foundational structure and framework for interoperability and integration of LVC training support systems. This integrated training environment is interoperable with mission command systems and enables training and mission rehearsals. The LVC ITE creates a realistic, net-centric, on-demand distributed training and mission rehearsal capability. Its framework will govern the structure, relationships, principles, guidelines, and standards for LVC components and their linkage to Joint, service, and combatant command LVC systems.

c.             The LVC training infrastructure provides the means for communicating, exchanging data and networking for all of the LVC domains. The LVC infrastructure includes installations’ foundational elements and components needed to perform net-centric mission command training— (1) Facilities.

(2)    Power.

(3)    Communications (Radio Frequency/Fiber) Networks.

(4)    TSSs.

(5)    Personnel and equipment.

(6)    Resources.

(7)    Management structure and organization.

3–23. Live, Virtual, Constructive Integrated Training Environment Implementation

The LVC ITE consists of increments—

a.      Increments focus on training a single armor brigade combat team at home station with the mission training

complex as the hub for integrating the three training environments and the Army Mission Command System.

b.      Follow-on increments will add to these capabilities as determined by the TSS Enterprise and approved by the

TGOSC.

c.      Locations at which the LVC ITE is implemented are determined by the TSS Enterprise and approved by the TGOSC.

Chapter 4 Training Support System Program Organization, Execution, and Management

Section I Governance

4–1. Army Training Support System organization

The TSS organization is a community of practice including—DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR), ACOMs, ASCCs, DRUs, senior commanders, garrison commanders (GCs), Directorate of Plans, Training, Mobilization, and Security (DPTMS), and MCs. Each TSS program has a designated lead agent and CBTDEV for materiel requirements. The TSS lead agent and CBTDEV for each of the TSS programs, or collectively across the programs, are assigned to the TRADOC’s Deputy Commander for Training, U.S. Army CAC–T, which includes the ATSC.

a. The lead agent is an organization assigned with sole responsibility and delegated authority for specific actions

otherwise exercised by a higher level organization or executive. The lead agent for— (1) SRP is the ATSC TCM-Live.

(2)    STSP is ATSC STIDD.

(3)    MCTSP is the NSC.

(4)    CTC modernization is the Combat Training Center Directorate.

(5)    Training Information Infrastructure is the TCM for Army Training Information System.

b. CBTDEV is the command or agency that formulates training materiel requirements. The CBTDEV for—

(1)   SRP and CTC modernization is TCM-Live.

(2)   STSP is TCM-Live and TCM-Virtual Training Environment.

(3)   MCTSP is TCM-Virtual Training Environment; TCM Constructive Training Environment; and TCM-Gaming.

(4)   CTC Program for the LVC ITE is the NSC.

(5)   Training Information Infrastructure is TCM-Army Training Information System and TCM for DistributedLearning.

4–2. The Training Support System Enterprise

a.    The TSS Enterprise is an established collaboration of organizations whose structure, governance systems, and

culture support the TSS Program.

b.    The TSS Enterprise consists of—

(1)    DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR).

(2)    TRADOC CAC–T.

c.          The TSS Enterprise is an integrated training support structure that encompasses management of TSS products, services, and facilities that support the operational, institutional, and self-development training domains. The TSS Enterprise enables Army training strategies and maintains standards across the entire Army. The TSS Enterprise is tasked with the Armywide implementation of training support policy and is responsible for continuously improving, monitoring, and transforming the global TSS LVC capabilities that support Soldiers and MCs in accordance with the

ACP and ARFORGEN.

d.         The TSS Enterprise will—

(1)          Utilize proven business rules and techniques to sustain a unity of effort to fulfill the MCs’ (ACOM/ASCC/DRU) training needs.

(2)          Leverage existing structures within the CAC–T to support institutional and operational training across the Army.

(3)          Assess the training effectiveness and value added of fielded training systems to ensure they are meetingcommand training requirements within the ARFORGEN construct.

e. The TSS Enterprise functions include the following:

(1)          Enable Army training strategies and maintain training standards across the entire Army.

(2)          Validate, integrate, standardize, and recommend TSS needs and priorities to DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) forapproval.

(3)          Implement Armywide training support policies and be responsible for continuously improving, monitoring, andtransforming the global TSS LVC capabilities that support Soldiers and MCs, in accordance with the ACP and

ARFORGEN.

f. TSS Enterprise responsibilities include the following:

(1)    Monitoring, adjusting, improving, and transforming global TSS operations via a series of management forums.

(2)    Establishing business rules to execute TSS functions and tasks.

(3)    Addressing all user needs for TSS capabilities and enablers.

( 4 ) E n a b l i n g T S S c a p i t a l i z a t i o n a n d r e c a p i t a l i z a t i o n i n a c c o r d a n c e w i t h C S A a n d D C S , G – 3 / 5 / 7 ( G – 3 7 / T R ) priorities.

(5)   Leveraging economies of scale for TSS execution.

(6)   Employing corporate planning process to maximize resources.

(7)   Training and equipping the TSS Enterprise and TSS executors at home stations.

(8)   Providing configuration and control of enterprise infrastructure resources.

(9)   Establishing manpower standards.

(10)                        Providing TSS support for ACOM/ASCC/DRU deployed units.

(11)                        Collaborating with vested ACOM/ASCC/DRU on TSS Enterprise decisions and policies.

(12)                        Allocating and apportioning TSS resources.

(13)                        Transparently planning, programming, and budgeting for investment areas identified in, or generated by, theACP and Army training strategy to achieve strategic vision.

( 1 4 ) C o n d u c t i n g c o m p r e h e n s i v e c r a d l e - t o - g r a v e s t r a t e g i c p l a n n i n g f o r m a n a g e m e n t a n d r e t i r e m e n t o f T S S capabilities.

(15)                        Enabling full cycle integration across all environments (for example, LVC and gaming) in all training domains(operational, institutional and self-development).

(16)                        Synchronizing efforts with emerging needs, via Army Capabilities Integration Center.

(17)                        Providing consistent, corporate Army representation on TSS matters in Joint, OSD, and sister-Service community forums.

(18)                        Promoting compliance with Armywide TSS standards by commands executing TSS.

(19)                        Providing for focused operations sustainment for long range TSS viability.

(20)                        Implementing assets, notably range sustainability.

(21)                        Establishing TSS facilities functional standards and coordinating TSS MILCON projects.

(22)                        Collaborating with ACSIM/ IMCOM to integrate base operating support and TSS investments, includingidentification of SRM funding for ranges, mission training complexes, and TSC in annual IMCOM funding letter guidance/documents and receipt of fair share of SRM funding in the year of execution. Additionally, common levels of service, SGO, A–76 (competitive sourcing), and other initiatives influencing resourcing.

( 2 3 ) G a t h e r i n g a n d a n a l y z i n g o b j e c t i v e d a t a t o a s s e s s p e r f o r m a n c e a n d t r e n d s w i t h r e s p e c t t o t h e a b o v e responsibilities.

(24) Implementing Army TSS policy and providing prioritized capabilities to each command that executes TSS in order to meet MC’s training needs.

4–3. Installation level command and control

The following positions play a central role in TSS management at the installation level:

a.         Senior commanders are the HQDA-designated commanders responsible for all installation activities.

b.         GCs are designated by HQDA (normally an O–6 or O–5). The GC is responsible to the CG, IMCOM and the senior commander for the day-to-day operations of the garrison. On IMCOM installations, within CONUS, the GC supports senior commander and MC TSS requirements, as approved and resourced by DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR). c. MCs.

(1)          MCs are tenant or habitual users of TSS assets on an installation. Habitual users are ARNG and USAR units thatdo not reside on the installation where they conduct primary training. MCs are responsible for identifying training needs and conducting mission operational and institutional training, as necessary, to attain and maintain unit and individual readiness standards as set forth in ARs.

(2)          MCs request TSS services, facilities, and products required to execute training. For missions directed through theARFORGEN process, MCs can raise support concerns during the Training Support and Resourcing Conference. For persistent installation training support shortfalls, or for suggested training support improvements/capability not yet fielded to the Army at large, the MCs will request necessary installation support.

d. The DPTMS executes TSS functions as resourced by DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR), directed by the senior commander and GC, and in accordance with DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) policy through application of common levels of service.

Section II Program Execution

4–4. Execution commands

a.    Execution commands provide management and oversight of TSS products, services, and facilities on an installa-

tion or training site in support of MC institutional and operational training functions.

b.    Execution commands are—

(1)    IMCOM on active component and USARC installations in the CONUS.

(2)    USARPAC.

(3)    National Guard Bureau for ARNG installations in the United States.

(4)    USAREUR.

(5)    ARCENT (in U.S. Central Command AOR).

4–5. Functional exceptions to execution command responsibilities

TSS is executed by IMCOM within CONUS and by MCs in their designated regions-USAREUR; USARPAC, ARNG; ARCENT in the CENTCOM AOR; ATEC (for ITAM, only) on test ranges and for excepted functions.

a. Test Ranges and Centers operated by ATEC are ATEC mission. In accordance with AR 350–19, the ATEC TSS Program is limited to the ITAM component of SRP at the following ATEC installations:

(1)    Aberdeen Test Center.

(2)    White Sands Missile Range.

(3)    Dugway Proving Ground.

(4)    Yuma Proving Ground.

b.    FORSCOM executes STSP and SRP (including ITAM) at Fort Irwin, CA.

c.    Mission training complexes operated by USARC are USARC mission.

(1)    Houston, TX.

(2)    Arlington Heights, IL.

(3)    Birmingham, AL.

(4)    Fort Dix, NJ.

(5)    Camp Parks, CA.

d.    Local training areas operated by the USARC regional support commands are USARC mission.

e.    Mission training complexes operated by the institutional training venues are assigned missions as follows:

(1)   The Intelligence Center of Excellence at Fort Huachuca, AZ.

(2)   The Signal Center, Center of Excellence at Fort Gordon, GA.

(3)   Army Medical Department Center and School - MEDCOM (Fort Sam Houston, TX) - supports U.S. Army Northand USARSO mission command training.

(4)   Special Warfare Center - USASOC (Fort Bragg, NC).

(5)   Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA.

(6)   Sergeants Major Academies at Fort Bliss, TX, and Fort McCoy, WI.

(7)   Finance, Adjutant General, and Chaplain Schools, Fort Jackson, SC.

(8)   Command and General Staff College, Fort Leavenworth, KS.

(9)   Maneuver Support Center of Excellence at Fort Leonard Wood, MO.

(10)                        Aviation School, Fort Rucker, AL.

(11)                        The Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, Charlottesville, VA.

(12)                        The Maneuver Support Center of Excellence at Fort Leonard Wood, MO.

f.     TSS in the CENTCOM AOR is executed by ARCENT.

g.    ARCENT operates the mission training complex at Shaw AFB, SC.

4–6. Execution support commands

Execution support commands provide services (acquisition, engineering, integration, or services at the installation) at any or all levels (national, regional, installation, and so forth) in order to provide training capabilities to execution commands managing TSS. The execution support commands provide technical expertise needed to deliver TSS of infrastructure and/or systems. The execution support commands (and agencies) are as follows:

a.         USACE provides engineering services and capabilities for training and TSS facilities.

b.         PEO STRI provides responsive, interoperable simulation, training, and testing solutions and acquisition services for the training environment. Serves as materiel developer for NSTD and technical center of expertise for development, acquisition, and sustainment of all TADSS.

(1)      Provides approved LVC integrated architecture common standards, hardware, software, and infrastructure forArmy and Joint LVC simulations, simulators, and instrumentation.

(2)      Develops common interoperable components, such as multi-level security and AAR systems.

c.      PEO Enterprise Information System provides the Army training environment with information services by developing, acquiring, integrating, deploying, and sustaining network-centric knowledge-based information technology and business management systems, communications and infrastructure solutions through leveraged commercial and enterprise capabilities.

d.      Tank-automotive Life Cycle Management Command provides acquisition, contracting, and business advisory

services for the Army Targetry System for selected TSS range systems.

e.      IMCOM, USAEC provides environmental technical support to the DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) for Range Moderni-

zation and Range Operations.

f.       CIO/G–6 provides—

(1)          Support to the DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR), TSS Enterprise, and program leads on information technology systemengineering, designs, infrastructure and integration of assigned training systems.

(2)          Technical assistance to the DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) and coordination between CIO/G–6 on the telecommunication requirements to support Army training and other information technology policies impacting the TSS capability.

4–7. Supported commands

Supported commanders are responsible for executing operational and/or institutional training conducted for the readiness of Soldiers and assigned units. Supported commands are further categorized as operational and/or institutional commands and are as follows:

a. Commanders executing operational training that receive TSS from IMCOM include— (1) FORSCOM.

(2)    U.S. Army North (with the exception of MCTSP provided by MEDCOM).

(3)    USARSO (with the exception of MCTSP provided by MEDCOM).

(4)    USASOC (with the exception of MCTSP).

(5)    ARCENT (CONUS HQ) (with the exception of MCTSP).

(6)    MEDCOM for medical units (SRP and STSP at Fort Sam Houston).

(7)    MDW.

(8)    USARC (with the exception of MCTSP).

b. Commanders executing institutional training receiving TSS from IMCOM include—

(1)    TRADOC (with the exception of MCTSP).

(2)    MEDCOM for U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School.

(3)    USASOC for Special Warfare Center.

(4)    USMA.

4–8. Training Support System execution on Joint bases and U.S. Air Force bases where Army units are stationed

a. TSS program policies, oversight, management, and execution responsibilities are retained by the Army through IMCOM Army Support Agencies at Joint bases and for Army units stationed at specific Joint bases as follows:

(1)   Ranges, ITAM, and TSC at Fort Eustis, VA.

(2)   Ranges, ITAM (Camp Bullis), mission training complex, and TSC at Fort Sam Houston, TX.

(3)   Ranges, ITAM, and TSC at Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst.

(4)   IMCOM Army Support Activity will oversee ranges at Eglin AFB, FL, in support of USASOC/7th SpecialForces Group.

(5)   Ranges, ITAM, mission training complex, and TSC at Joint Base Lewis-McChord.

b. The following commands provide program policy, oversight, management, and execution:

(1)      ARCENT will operate the mission training complex at Shaw AFB, SC.

(2)      Ranges, ITAM, mission training complex, and TSC at Fort Richardson, AK are an USARPAC responsibility forJoint Base Elmendorf Richardson, the U.S. Air Force will serve as the lead. USARPAC, versus IMCOM, will execute TSS on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson.

( 3 ) R a n g e s , I T A M , m i s s i o n t r a i n i n g c o m p l e x , a n d T S C i n K o r e a , J a p a n , a n d O k i n a w a a r e a U S A R P A C responsibility.

Section III Training Support System Forums

4–9. Training General Officer Steering Committee

The TGOSC, which is chaired by the DCS, G–3/5/7, recommends improvements in training development policy, strategy, and capabilities needed to provide trained and ready Soldiers, leaders, and units to the combined, Joint, interagency, and/or multinational forces of combatant commanders. TGOSC membership requirements and supporting COC and working groups are defined in AR 350–1.

4–10. Training Support Work Group

a.             The TSWG is an integrating and decision forum for the major Army training support programs. The TSWG serves to address TSS PMR issues and provides direction and focus for the TSS actions in support of the Army Training Strategy. The TSWG directly supports the Combined COC and the TGOSC process. The TSWG will consider issues generated by each of the TSS PMRs, and identify any issues that need to go forward to Combined COC forums for their review, decision, or forwarding to the TGOSC. The TSWG is an integration and decision forum for major programs of the Army TSS. The TSWG will consider issues generated by management reviews of each TSS program and identify issues that need to go forward to the Combined COC/TGOSC for their review and action.

b.             The TSWG is co-chaired by DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR) and TRADOC CAC–T ATSC TSAID and includes a TRADOC lead agent point of contact for each TSS program, a PEO STRI representative, and a representative from each ACOM/ASCC/DRU with equities in TSS. TSWG co-chairs adjudicate voting ties.

c.             Voting members of the TSWG are TSS representatives from the following organizations:

(1)       DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR).

(2)       TRADOC CAC–T ATSC TSAID.

(3)       IMCOM.

(4)       FORSCOM G3.

(5)       USARC.

(6)       National Guard Bureau.

(7)       USAREUR.

(8)       USARPAC.

(9)       ARCENT.

(10)    U.S. Army North.

(11)    USARSO.

(12)    MDW.

(13)    MEDCOM.

(14)    USASOC.

(15)    USMA.

d. A TSWG Executive Session meets semiannually and consists of DCS, G–3/5/7 (G–37/TR), ATSC TSAID, TRADOC TSS TCMs and lead agents, and PEO STRI representatives.

4–11. Training Support System Program Management Review meetings

a. The TSS PMR meets to provide the MCTSP, STSP, SRP and Training Information Infrastructure, with a forum

to—

(1)          Receive TSS needs identified by TSS execution and supported commands.

(2)          Review and address all components of their program with the respective ACOM, ASCC, and DRU TSSmanagers.

(3)          Ensure the TSS products, services, and facilities support and enable the execution of training at home station,service schools, and while deployed.

b. The TSS PMR meets periodically to—

(1)    Provide a forum for ACOM, ASCC, DRU, and IMCOM presentations of TSS program needs.

(2)    Review the status of TSS program needs and identify additional needs.

(3)    Discuss TSS program initiatives and projects having Armywide impact.

(4)    Discuss budget submission and user requirements through review of the annual work plan submissions.

(5)    Ensure integration of TSS core and support programs.

(6)    Exchange information and requirements related to general TSS topics.

4–12. Combat Training Center quarterly reviews

a.    TSS participation in CTC Program management is limited to CTC modernization and the instrumentation and

facilities pillars of the CTC Program.

b.    The quarterly CTC Operations and Modernization Program review meetings provide a forum to—

(1)          Review and address all components of their program with the respective ACOM, ASCC, and DRU TSSmanagers.

(2)          Ensure the CTC facilities support and enable the execution of training at home station, service schools, andwhile deployed.

c.    DCS, G–3/5/7 chairs the CTC quarterly review meetings.

d.    Supporting execution command is PEO STRI.

4–13. Training Support System modern