AR 601-2 ARMY RECRUITING SUPPORT PROGRAMS

Army Regulation 601–2

Personnel Procurement

Army

Recruiting

Support

Programs

Headquarters

Department of the Army

Washington, DC 27 September 2016

UNCLASSIFIED

SUMMARY of CHANGE

AR 601–2

Army Recruiting Support Programs This revision, dated 27 September 2016--

o   Changes the title of this publication (cover).o Incorporates a new chapter on mission support (chap 9).

o   Removes United States Army Accessions Command roles and responsibilities(throughout).

o   Removes the Operation Sergeant Major of the Army Recruiting Team(throughout).

         Headquarters                                                                                                                            *Army Regulation 601–2

Department of the Army Washington, DC

         27 September 2016                                                                                                                  Effective 27 October 2016

Personnel Procurement

Army Recruiting Support Programs


Top of the SIGNATURE block

H i s t o r y . T h i s p u b l i c a t i o n i s a m a j o r revision.

S u m m a r y . T h i s r e g u l a t i o n e s t a b l i s h e s p o l i c i e s a n d p r o c e d u r e s f o r c o n d u c t i n g the: Total Army Involvement in Recruiti n g P r o g r a m ; G e n e r a l O f f i c e r S p o n s o r P r o g r a m ; E d u c a t o r / C e n t e r s o f I n f l u e n c e T o u r P r o g r a m ; C e n t e r s o f I n f l u e n c e

Events Program; Delayed Entry Program/

D e l a y e d T r a i n i n g P r o g r a m f u n c t i o n s ; H o m e t o w n R e c r u i t i n g A s s i s t a n c e P r o gram; Department of the Army Civilian Recruiting Program; Recruiting and Res e r v e P a r t n e r s h i p C o u n c i l ; a n d A r m y c o m m a n d a n d i n s t a l l a t i o n r e c r u i t i n g programs.

Applicability. This regulation applies to t h e R e g u l a r A r m y , t h e A r m y N a t i o n a l

Guard/Army National Guard of the United States, and the U.S. Army Reserve, unless o t h e r w i s e s t a t e d . I t a l s o a p p l i e s t o t h e

U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command, for Centers of Influence events that it initiates, in support of the Department o f D e f e n s e S t u d e n t T e s t i n g P r o g r a m .

Heads of Headquarters, Department of the Army agencies and commanders of Army commands, installations, or activities must have knowledge of AR 340–21 and AR 25–55.

Proponent and exception authority. The proponent of this regulation is the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1. The proponent has the authority to approve exceptions or waivers to this regulation that are consistent with controlling law and regulations. The proponent may delegate this approval authority, in writing, to a division chief within the proponent agency or its direct reporting unit or field operating agency, in the grade of colonel or the civilian equivalent. Activities may request a waiver to this regulation by providing justification that includes a full analysis of t h e e x p e c t e d b e n e f i t s a n d m u s t i n c l u d e f o r m a l r e v i e w b y t h e a c t i v i t y ’ s s e n i o r legal officer. All waiver requests will be e n d o r s e d b y t h e c o m m a n d e r o r s e n i o r leader of the requesting activity and forwarded through their higher headquarters t o t h e p o l i c y p r o p o n e n t . R e f e r t o A R

25–30 for specific guidance.

Army internal control process. This regulation contains internal control provisions, in accordance with AR 11–2, and identifies key internal controls that must be evaluated (see appendix B).

S u p p l e m e n t a t i o n . S u p p l e m e n t a t i o n o f this regulation and establishment of command and local forms are prohibited without prior approval from the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1 (DAPE–MPA), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0300.

Suggested improvements. Users are invited to send comments and suggested improvements on DA Form 2028 (Recomm e n d e d C h a n g e s t o P u b l i c a t i o n s a n d

Blank Forms) directly to the Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1 (DAPE–MPA), 300 Army Pentagon, Washington, DC 20310–0300.

C o m m i t t e e m a n a g e m e n t . A R 1 5 – 3 9 requires the proponent to justify establishi n g / c o n t i n u i n g c o m m i t t e e ( s ) , c o o r d i n a t e draft publications, and coordinate changes in committee status with the Office of the Administrative Assistant to the Secretary o f t h e A r m y , A n a l y s i s a n d I n t e g r a t i o n C e l l ( A A A I – C L ) , 1 0 5 A r m y P e n t a g o n ,

Washington D.C. 20310–0105. Further, if i t i s d e t e r m i n e d t h a t a n e s t a b l i s h e d

"group" identified within this regulation later takes on the characteristics of a committee as found in AR 15–39, then the proponent will follow AR 15–39 requirements for establishing and continuing the group as a committee.

Distribution. This publication is available in electronic media only and is intended for command levels A, B, C, and D for the Regular Army, the Army National Guard/Army National Guard of the U n i t e d  S t a t e s ,  a n d  t h e  U . S .  A r m y

Reserve.


*This publication supersedes AR 601–2, dated 2 March 2010.

AR 601–2 • 27 September 2016 i UNCLASSIFIED

Contents (Listed by paragraph and page number)

Chapter 1 Army Recruiting Support Programs, page 1

Section I

Introduction, page 1

Purpose • 1–1, page 1

References • 1–2, page 1

Explanation of abbreviations and terms • 1–3, page 1

Responsibilities • 1–4, page 1 Overview • 1–5, page 1

Section II

Responsibilities, page 1

Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1 • 1–6, page 1

Chief, National Guard Bureau • 1–7, page 2

Chief, Army Reserve • 1–8, page 2

Commanders of Army Commands • 1–9, page 2

Chapter 2 Total Army Involvement in Recruiting Program, page 3

Objectives • 2–1, page 3

Policy • 2–2, page 3

Program responsibilities and procedures • 2–3, page 3

Chapter 3 General Officer/Senior Executive Service Recruiting Support Program, page 4 Objectives • 3–1, page 4

Policy • 3–2, page 5

Program roles and procedures • 3–3, page 5

Chapter 4 Educator/Centers of Influence Tour Program, page 5

Objectives • 4–1, page 5

Policy • 4–2, page 6

Program roles and procedures • 4–3, page 6

Chapter 5 Centers of Influence Events Program, page 7

Objective • 5–1, page 7

Event policies • 5–2, page 7

Program roles and procedures • 5–3, page 8

Chapter 6 Delayed Entry Program/Delayed Training Program Gatherings, page 8 Objectives • 6–1, page 8

Policy • 6–2, page 8

Program roles and procedures • 6–3, page 8

Chapter 7 Hometown and Special Recruiter Assistance Program, page 9

Objectives • 7–1, page 9

Policy • 7–2, page 9

Hometown Recruiter Assistance Program and procedures • 7–3, page 9

ii                                                                              AR 601–2 • 27 September 2016


Contents—Continued

Special Recruiter Assistance Program and procedures • 7–4, page 12

Chapter 8 Recruiting and Reserve Partnership Council, page 13

Objectives • 8–1, page 13

Policy • 8–2, page 13

Program roles and procedures • 8–3, page 14 Common areas of interest • 8–4, page 15

Chapter 9 Mission Support, page 16

Objectives • 9–1, page 16

Policy • 9–2, page 16

Leader execution • 9–3, page 18

Appendixes

A.     References, page 20

B.     Internal Control Evaluation, page 22

Glossary

iii


 


Chapter 1

Army Recruiting Support Programs

Section I Introduction

1–1. Purpose

This regulation establishes policy, responsibilities, and procedures for conducting the recruiting support programs reflected in paragraph 1–5. It applies to recruiting support programs and related activities in support of the Army’s recruiting efforts across all three Army components. This regulation reforms current practices by setting a standard for conducting recruiting support programs.

1–2. References See appendix A.

1–3. Explanation of abbreviations and terms See the glossary.

1–4. Responsibilities

See section II of this chapter.

1–5. Overview

a. The Total Army Involvement in Recruiting (TAIR) Program, whereby Army Commands (ACOMs), field operating agencies (FOAs), the Army National Guard of the United States (ARNGUS), and the U.S. Army Reserve (USAR) furnish equipment and personnel to the U.S. Army Recruiting Command (USAREC) and the U.S. Army Cadet Command (USACC), to participate in recurring and continued promotional activities that enhance attainment of the Total Army recruiting mission. The TAIR program is focused on two basic campaigns— (1) Prospects (primary).

(2) Army awareness (secondary).

b.             The General Officer Recruiting Support Program provides general officers the opportunity to support recruiting

activities in their hometowns or alma maters, or during their official travels.

c.             The Educator/Centers of Influence (E/COI) Tour Program provides E/COI tours of Army installations and activities for educators and “centers of influence,” which are groups or people that bolster the Army’s image or help influence individuals who are considering Army service.

d.             The Centers of Influence (COI) Events Program provides information on Army opportunities and options to COI. For the U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command (USMEPCOM), COI events provide information on the Department of Defense (DOD) Student Testing Program; in particular, the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) tests offered in the nation’s high schools.

e.             Delayed Entry Program (DEP)/Delayed Training Program (DTP) functions reinforce the commitment made by

members of the Army’s DEP and DTP.

f.              The Recruiting and Reserve Partnership Council (R2PC) is a forum to establish a perpetual partnership, improve communications, and synchronize recruiting efforts between USAREC and USAR Command (USARC). The primary function of this council is to enhance and improve recruiting activities in support of U.S. Army Reserve troop program units.

Section II Responsibilities

1–6. Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1 The DCS, G–1 will:

a.    Establish policy for the conduct of the Regular Army (RA) and USAR promotional recruiting programs and

provide guidance to USMEPCOM with regard to COI events in support of the DOD Student Testing Program.

b.    Monitor and ensure adequate funding for recruiting activities.

c.    Through the Commanding General, U.S. Army Human Resources Command (CG, HRC):

(1)          Provide key players to participate in the quarterly ACQUIRE Portfolio Integrated Working Group (APIWG), asreflected in chapter 9 of this regulation.

(2)          Provide key players to participate in the monthly Multi-Component Accession Working Group (MCAWG), asreflected in chapter 9 of this regulation.

(3)          Provide quarterly listings of all Individual Ready Reserve personnel to USAREC, to assist in recruiting priorservice personnel.

1–7. Chief, National Guard Bureau The Chief, NGB will:

a.      Encourage State governments, through State Adjutants General, to support Total Army recruiting efforts as State

priorities permit.

b.      Encourage States to provide resources (that is, equipment and manpower) of the Army National Guard (ARNG) to support Total Army recruiting and awareness efforts when RA and USAR resources have been exhausted or when significant cost efficiencies can be accommodated. The USAREC requirements on the ARNG will be coordinated through the Adjutant General in the state where the requirement exists. Coordination between USAREC and the National Guard Bureau (NGB) is not required.

c.      Encourage participation in recruiting conferences.

1–8. Chief, Army Reserve The CAR will:

a.      Provide man-day space funding for USAR units and individuals to support recruiting efforts, as well as funding for USAR-related TAIR, General Officer Speaker Program, E/COI tours, COI events, DTP functions, and U.S. Army Medical Department (AMEDD) subject matter expert events.

b.      Encourage participation in recruiting-related conventions and events.

c.      Coordinate and execute R2PCs with CG, USAREC.

d.      See additional program responsibilities and procedures in chapters 2 through 9.

1–9. Commanders of Army Commands ACOM commanders will:

a.         Support the recruiting mission of the RA and the USAR/ARNG as directed by this regulation. Direct subordinate units to help with promotional recruiting support programs. Commanders can leverage the assigned Recruiting Outreach NCO (noncommissioned officer) to support the coordination and clear a path for all Army Recruiting Support Programs, if available.

b.         Conduct public affairs programs supporting promotional recruiting programs.

c.          Ensure that installation and activity commanders maintain a central coordination office responsible for processing

support requests for all tenant units, and provide a point of contact to USAREC.

d.         Participate in recruiting support conferences. Ensure compliance with Army conference policy reflected in AR 15–39 prior to determining participation at any recruiting conferences.

e.          Provide recruiting support from local resources whenever possible.

f.           Establish funding requirements to procure recognition items of nominal or modest value for recruitment purposes, and to present such items to members of the Army, their Family members, and other individuals recognized as providing support that significantly contributes to service recruitment. Ensure consistency in scope and value of recognition items across the RA and USAR components.

(1)          Each recognition item provided under this policy will be valued at less than $50 per item, with items limited tocommemorative coins, medals, trophies, badges, flags, posters, paintings, or similar things designed to recognize or commemorate service in the Armed Forces.

(2)          This guidance does not apply to existing programs where appropriated funds are used to purchase trinkets (forexample, pencils, magnets, computer mouse pads) distributed for recruiting purposes.

g.      Explain and promote the RA, ARNG, and USAR to both public and command information audiences.

h.      Provide recruiting information to installations (and all general officer level commands) for use in speakers’ kits.

i.       Provide public affairs assets to recruiting battalions, and promote the positive story such assets produce.

j.       Conduct frequent installation tours for groups of E/COIs and prospects.

k.      Respond to support requests made within time frames given in paragraph 2–3d.

l.       Provide timely responses to USAREC requests for support as stated in paragraph 2–3d, below. Cancellations of previously approved assets must be minimized in order for recruiters to maintain their credibility in communities.

m.    Ensure support personnel participating in promotional recruiting projects are properly briefed or rehearsed prior

to their presentation.

n.      Provide to USAREC information for establishing a digital library of available TAIR assets.

o.      Promote access to Army clubs, theaters, and other recreational facilities for recruiters, E/COIs, and prospects.

p.      The CG, USAREC will coordinate, execute, and monitor the R2PCs in accordance with guidance provided in chapter 8 of this publication.

q.      See additional program responsibilities and procedures in chapters 2 through 9.

Chapter 2

Total Army Involvement in Recruiting Program

2–1. Objectives

The objectives of the TAIR program are to—

a.      Help maintain the authorized RA and USAR personnel strength and readiness.

b.      Help recruit specific military occupational specialties (MOSs), and attain the high school diploma graduate and Test Score Category I–IIIA recruiting goals each fiscal year.

c.      Help recruit specific military areas of concentration (AOCs) and attain the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and the Dental Admission Test (DAT) to support AMEDD recruiting goals each fiscal year.

d.      Improve the Army’s image through the use of promotional assets that increase awareness and interest in Army

opportunities.

e.      Help maintain coordination between the recruiting force, the Army Staff, the Army in the field, the ARNG, and

the USAR.

2–2. Policy

a. Two basic campaigns will be conducted under the TAIR program, in order of priority, as follows:

(1)          Prospect Campaign. These activities will be conducted to reach the primary recruiting audience in high schools, trade schools, community colleges, colleges, universities, pre-med, healthcare professional career schools, and similar settings. The activities include MOS skill clinics, AOC speaking engagements, lecture programs and demonstrations; static displays such as communications equipment, radar equipment, deployable rapid assembly shelter and vehicles; and ACOM exhibits. They also include sports clinics, job fairs, and orientation tours of military installations for RA and USAR enlistee prospects and medical officer prospects. Orientation tours are not to be confused with annual summer training encampments or drill competition for Junior Reserve Officers’ Training Corps students. Orientation tours must be initiated, planned, and conducted by USAREC elements with recruiters present throughout the tour. The TAIR projects are not to be confused with other ongoing or special programs conducted by commands other than USAREC, which are not part of the TAIR program.

(2)          Army Awareness Campaign. These activities will be used to reach the general public through participation in public activities such as parades, fairs, festivals, community celebrations, military open-house functions, job fairs, and public meetings. These activities may include military equipment displays and presentations; demonstration units such as Rangers, drill teams, and sports demonstration teams; and ACOM exhibits. They may also include speaker programs with general officers and other prominent spokespersons of Army bands and ceremonial units.

b.      The ACOMs, FOAs, and USAR will provide maximum support to all elements of USAREC in executing the RA and USAR recruiting mission. When RA and USAR resources have been exhausted or when significant cost efficiencies can be made, local recruiters may request ARNG resources through the Adjutant General in the states where the requirement exists.

c.      The ACOMs and FOAs will provide recruiting support and inform USAREC of funding requirements.

d.      Personnel and equipment involved in TAIR projects will be from units other than USAREC.

e.      Because role models are important to young Americans, units supporting TAIR projects may give priority to

participants who can be strong role models for the audience.

f.       Units whose first priority is to support the recruiting brigade boundaries where they are located will give second

priority to other recruiting brigades, as requested.

g.      As exceptions to the recruiting brigade boundary rule, units will give second priority for support to the recruiting brigade in which they are geographically located, and tertiary support to all other recruiting brigades, as requested.

2–3. Program responsibilities and procedures

a.             USAREC will establish operational and administrative procedures to request TAIR support from all supporting

units.

b.             Whenever possible, the processing of assets from supporting units should be requested though the Recruiting Outreach NCO if available. This can ensure effective communication and ensure the supporting units’ resources meet the objectives of the campaign.

c.             Early coordination between recruiting brigades or recruiting battalions and supporting units will be effected to facilitate early commitment of TAIR assets and processing of TAIR funding documents. For USAR units, the request will be routed through the unit’s Major General Command Headquarters.

d.             Recruiting brigade and battalion requests for TAIR support will be forwarded to arrive at the supporting unit not less than 45 calendar days prior to the project start date.

e.             Supporting units will respond to requests for TAIR support not less than 30 calendar days prior to the project start

date.

f.              Scheduling commitments will not be made until the supporting unit or installation has agreed to provide the requested support and any required approval has been obtained. Commitments made to civilian communities and sponsors must be honored whenever possible.

g.             Factors that will be considered in determining the priorities and requirements to use promotional resources are as

follows:

(1)    Headquarters, Department of the Army policy.

(2)    Impact on mission.

(3)    Availability of resources.

(4)    Target audience.

(5)    Cost effectiveness and efficiency.

(6)    Density of promotional support in the area.

(7)    Weather conditions that may affect use of promotional resources.

h.             Requests for Active Duty for Operational Support (ADOS) funds, required to employ USAR personnel in TAIR projects, will be processed according to established USAREC and USAR policies. The TAIR funds will be used to support TAIR projects conducted by USAREC. The TAIR funds will not be used for ongoing or special programs conducted or initiated by other commands—unless those projects are in the best interest of the Army recruiting effort, as determined by USAREC.

i.              The TAIR funds may be used to fund travel and per diem, and to reimburse units for fuel, maintenance costs, and

other services incurred as a result of USAR and ARNG participation in TAIR projects.

j.              The ARNG ADOS funds are not available for ARNG personnel through USAREC channels. The TAIR funds

cannot be used for this purpose.

k.             The ADOS funds allocated to USAREC may be used for USAR personnel participating in TAIR projects when funds are available and the project qualifies for such funding. When ADOS funding is not available through USAREC or the USAR unit, USAR assets and personnel may participate during periods of inactive duty training if the TAIR project directly enhances unit training or individual training.

l.              Costs of TAIR projects must be agreed upon between USAREC and the supporting unit. Failure to ensure that adequate funds are available may result in a violation of Section 1517, Title 31, United States Code (31 USC 1517) and DFAS–IN Regulation 37–1.

m.           The TAIR projects will be funded by Defense Travel System (DTS) cross line accounting, via the USAREC

requesting agency

n.             If funding of travel and transportation, or per diem, is not required all other costs will be reimbursed via the General Fund Enterprise Business System transfer.

o.             Supporting units will process orders via DTS using a USAREC cross line accounting. Requests and approvals for ADOS and TAIR funds, and related documents, will be filed electronically for 2 years after the event has occurred, and then the documents are destroyed.

Chapter 3

General Officer/Senior Executive Service Recruiting Support Program

3–1. Objectives

The objectives of the General Officer/Senior Executive Service (SES) Recruiting Support Program are as follows:

a.      Increase general officer/SES involvement in the recruiting effort.

b.      Improve the understanding of, and support for, service in the Army and motivate all Army members to help the

recruiting effort.

c.       Help publicize enlistment and commissioning opportunities and the advantages of Army service to influencers and

prospects.

d.      Provide high level recognition of recruiter’s efforts to meet recruiting goals.

e.       Develop new platforms and better methods to convey the Army’s recruiting message to COIs and prospects.

f.        Improve relationships within local communities, the high school and college markets, and the healthcare student and professional markets; and improve awareness of Army opportunities within applicable demographics and national organizations.

g.      Maintain the involvement of RA and USAR general officers in support of USAREC’s Total Army recruiting objectives.

3–2. Policy

a.      General officers and SES members will be invited to recruiting battalion activities in and around their hometowns and high school or college alma maters, as well as other areas where they can make an impact in the community.

b.      General officers and SES members invited to participate in recruiting activities should have an appropriate

connection, such as a “historical or business tie” with the geographical area of the recruiting battalion.

c.      General officer and SES sponsors may be asked to:

( 1 ) P a r t i c i p a t e i n r e c r u i t i n g b a t t a l i o n ’ s a n n u a l t r a i n i n g c o n f e r e n c e s o r a w a r d p r e s e n t a t i o n s , t o h e l p m o t i v a t e recruiters by recognizing their efforts.

(2)          Address civic groups, organizations, high schools and/or colleges, area educators, and other COI to improve therecruiting program.

(3)          Encourage area community and business leaders to support local Army recruiting efforts.

(4)          Participate in Partnership for Youth Success (PaYS) signing events or community leader events to increaseawareness of the PaYS program.

(5)          Address future Soldiers and their Family members at Future Soldier Training Program activities, to encourageand thank them for answering the call to duty.

(6)          Help improve relationships with high schools and colleges, especially those they attended, and improve awareness of Army opportunities.

d.         Other senior Army leaders, as well as Civilian Aides to the Secretary of the Army (CASAs), and USAR Ambassadors may also be asked to participate in the Recruiting Support Program.

e.          Personnel attending general officer presentations will be selected based on the following order:

(1)    Primary COIs for high school seniors, graduates, their parents, educators, and counselors.

(2)    College students and faculty.

(3)    Community and business leaders.

(4)    Media reaching high school seniors, graduates, parents, and influencers.

(5)    Potential applicants who are high school seniors and graduates.

(6)    National and/or regional level organizations (veteran/civic).

3–3. Program roles and procedures

a. The USAREC:

(1)   Identifies speaking and support opportunities, and invites the appropriate general officers to give support.

(2)   Coordinates with the general officer’s staff to develop an itinerary and arrange administrative and logisticalsupport for the officer’s participation in the recruiting support activities. Additional support is provided by the Recruiting Outreach NCO, if available.

(3)   Provides the general officer with relevant data on:

(a)    Current mission and accomplishments, recruiting battalion organization, and strength.

(b)    The recruiting environment.

(c)    The type of recruiting support needed by the local recruiters. (d) Other support in which the general officer may be able to assist.

b. To encourage other general officer sponsor involvement, the USAREC:

(1)   Coordinates with the appropriate General Officer Management Office (RA or Office, Chief of the ArmyReserve) (DACS–GOM) to maintain a current list of general officers, to include promotable colonels, stationed in the continental United States (CONUS).

(2)   Coordinates with the Office of the Chief, Public Affairs to maintain a list of CASAs.

(3)   Coordinates with the Office, Chief of the Army Reserve (OCAR) to maintain a list of Reserve Ambassadors.

(4)   Formally invites appropriate individuals to recruiting activities and events.

Chapter 4

Educator/Centers of Influence Tour Program

4–1. Objectives

The objectives of E/COI tours in support of RA and USAR recruiting are to:

a.    Provide tours of Army installations, medical treatment facilities, and activities for educators and other centers of

influence.

b.    Pass the following messages to E/COI:

(1)          Education and training opportunities in the Army are excellent, and Soldiers are encouraged to continue theireducation.

(2)          The Army is a choice that should be considered by every graduating high school senior and every healthcarestudent or professional.

(3)          The Army is genuinely interested in the welfare and development of its Soldiers.

(4)          Many students have limited knowledge of Army opportunities.

(5)          The Army consists of competent, well-trained, and proud multiskilled leaders who can perform critical functionsfrom warfighting to statesmanship to business management.

c. Directly support the recruiting effort by seeking improved access to schools, directory information, MCAT and DAT lists, students, graduates, and the scheduling of the ASVAB that is offered by the DOD Student Testing Program administered by USMEPCOM.

4–2. Policy

a.             The cost of this program will be minimized by conducting E/COI tours within USAREC recruiting brigade b o u n d a r i e s , a t t h e m o s t a p p r o p r i a t e i n s t a l l a t i o n o r m e d i c a l t r e a t m e n t f a c i l i t y a t t r a c t i n g t h e h i g h e s t n u m b e r o f participants.

b.             Group size for educator tours should be the minimum acceptable to the host installation, generally, not fewer than 14 E/COI and 2 USAREC escorts, and not more than 50 E/COI with 3 escorts.

c.             Although students should not normally be included on educator tours, key students who are clearly COIs may be

invited on a case-by-case basis.

d.             Army retirees and members of the RA, USAR, and ARNG who are already familiar with Army opportunities will

not normally be included as tour participants.

e.             Tours may include some pro-Army participants, but the majority should be open-minded neutrals and undecided COI.

f.              Emphasis should be on including “key COI” such as counselors, principals and school board members; presidents of professional organizations, deans of medical schools, and financial aid advisors who can later testify to the quality of Army skills, technical training, and well-being of young enlisted Soldiers and medical officers they have met; and those who can initiate support within their school systems after participating in tours.

g.             USAREC will have oversight and approve any request to conduct E/COI tours outside of a USAREC recruiting

brigade boundary.

4–3. Program roles and procedures

a. The USAREC:

(1)          Determines the targeted invitee group and the month and week when the invitees will be available and mostlikely to participate.

(2)          Determines the most appropriate site within USAREC recruiting brigade boundaries that will attract the largestnumber of the targeted group, according to location and availability of tour.

(a)    Contacts the installation’s tour coordinator and determines an acceptable itinerary.

(b)    Identifies available lodging, transportation, and their costs.

(c)    Submits a formal request for the tour in accordance with USAREC guidelines.

(d)    Obtains the installation’s agreement to host the tour for the desired time frame.

(e)    Confirms the total cost, and funding, and then approves the tour plan.

(3)   Approves exception requests to conduct E/COI tours outside of a USAREC recruiting brigade boundary.

(4)   Coordinates with the installation or activity being toured for photography assistance as necessary.

(5)   Sends formal letters of invitation to targeted E/COI. Invitations include a proposed travel schedule, highlightedbenefits, and points of interest to the invitee.

(6)   Makes follow-up contact to answer questions and develop final acceptance count.

(7)   Finalizes transportation and lodging arrangements and provides invitational travel orders to participants.

(8)   Continues follow-up activities with invitees to motivate them and minimize cancellations.

(9)   Plans public affairs coverage of tours; prepares and distributes news releases with photos to hometown newspapers. A group color photo will prove a valuable keepsake for each, ensuring goodwill for years following the tour.

(10)                        Ensures E/COI safety and comfort during the tour and afterward, until they leave the group to return home.

b.             A recruiting representative will solicit one time E/COI support at the onset of the tour and ask the E/COI to fill out a survey and a request for recruiter services, at the end of the tour. The latter will list available recruiter services so the E/COI participants are aware they exist and can request them. For example, recruiter presentations to junior and senior high school classes, career day, or job fair groups, and career counselor workshops; the scheduling of the ASVAB testing at a school; and the placement of an Army opportunities literature rack at a career counselor’s office.

c.             The tour coordinator prepares the after action report (AAR) at the end of the tour that summarizes the results reflected on the survey and the request for recruiter services turned in by the E/COI. The original copies of the survey and the request for recruiter services are sent to the sponsor recruiter for follow-up with E/COI.

d.             Requests and approvals for E/COI events and related documents are filed electronically for 2 years after the event

has occurred, and then the documents are destroyed.

Chapter 5

Centers of Influence Events Program

5–1. Objective

The objectives of the COI-focused events in support of RA and USAR recruiting are to:

a.    Establish Army advocacy among key community and private institution leaders.

b.    Offer COI participants an opportunity to “request recruiter information services” for community outreach events

in their communities, including educational institutions, government institutions and private organizations.

c.    Solicit COI participant support on behalf of their area youth for whom an Army enlistment may be an attractive

alternative.

5–2. Event policies

a.             Procurement for COI events will follow policies and procedures established by the servicing procurement officer, in accordance with this regulation. Expenditures will be limited to government purchase card limits for products and services. Requests for exceptions to policy will be forwarded to HQ USAREC for approval. HQ USMEPCOM will review and approve requests for exception. HQ USMEPCOM may delegate approval authority in writing to sector commanders.

b.             A small meal and refreshments may be provided during recruiting functions for both civilian and military

participants.

c.             Events are limited to small meals and refreshments within local, per-meal per-diem limits. Refer to www.gsa.gov for current, per-meal per-diem limits for guidance on the maximum allowable cost for meals within the local area. (1) Meals must be within authorized GSA per-diem limits for the event location. Title 10, United States Code, Subtitle A, Part II, Chapter 31, Section 520c is the authority for expenditure of appropriated funds for small meals and refreshments during recruiting functions. Funds will be expended as follows:

(2)      Persons who are objects of Army recruiting efforts.

(3)      Persons whose assistance in recruiting efforts of the Army is determined to be influential, if approved by theperson in charge of the event.

(4)      Members of the Army and DA Civilian employees when required to attend recruiting functions.

(5)      Other persons whose presence at recruiting functions will contribute to recruiting efforts, if approved by theperson in charge of the event.

d.             Funds for COI events will only pay for small meals, refreshments, and non-alcoholic beverages. When cost limits

are set, they must include any gratuity and non-exempt tax to preclude cost misjudgments.

e.             Since COI events are business or professional activities, spouses of COIs are not normally invited to attend COI events solely because they are the spouses. However, there may be occasions when, in order to address an evening board of education dinner meeting where board member spouses are always present, it is deemed justifiable to host the spouses as well, if approved by the person in charge of the event.

f.              Site convenience and attractiveness must be balanced against meal cost economies and the importance of the objectives sought. Targeted COIs might respond favorably to a nearby site (that is more expensive), but decline a more distant site (that is less expensive).

g.             Commands should continue to engage established COIs, but every effort must be made to identify new COIs.

h.             The DA military or civilian personnel required to participate in COI events may consume small meals or refreshments provided as part of the event at no cost to the member. This is consistent with guidance contained in DODD 5500.7–R. TAIR participants may be involved in COI-focused events. Examples include a general officer scheduled to speak at an event for COIs and TAIR skill team demonstrators scheduled to perform at such an event.

i.              If the presence of other than DA military or civilian personnel is deemed essential to the conduct of the COIfocused event, the small meal and refreshments for the person will be provided at government expense, if approved by the person in charge of the event. For example, a recruiter’s spouse is present because a female member of the invited board of education will not attend (or is reluctant to attend) unless there is another female present.

j.              COIs are not normally authorized to bring guests, but there are some events where it can be deemed appropriate. They can nominate someone; however, only the person in charge of the COI-focused event can approve the nomination and issue the invitation. This enables the person in charge of the COI event to keep abreast of acceptances and nonacceptances and relay any meal order changes to the vendor up to the time the meal count must be considered firm.

k.             Requests and approvals for COI events and related documents are filed electronically for 2 years after the event has occurred, and then the documents are destroyed.

5–3. Program roles and procedures

The procedures for managing COI-focused events are as follows:

a.      Identify candidate invitees, their location and the recruiter support sought from them as a result of hosting them at

an event for COIs.

b.      Determine when the event is needed, the presentation’s focus, and the desired outcome.

c.      Assign an event coordinator to prepare the funding request, select the food vendor and a no-cost meeting facility,

designate the program manager and speakers, and supervise the event.

d.      Arrange for someone to send formal letters of invitation to approved invitees; monitor their initial acceptances so that initial meal counts can be relayed to the food vendor; make reminder calls to acceptors just before the event to determine a more accurate final meal count; and call the revised count to the vendor to avoid ordering excess meals.

e.      Devise a means to capture COI pledges of support or COI requests for recruiter services made at the event so that their area recruiters can conduct the required follow-up. Plan public affairs coverage, to include photography, when appropriate; prepare and distribute new releases with photos to COI hometown newspapers, as appropriate.

Chapter 6

Delayed Entry Program/Delayed Training Program Gatherings

6–1. Objectives

The objectives of the DEP/DTP functions in support of RA and USAR recruiting, respectively, are to sponsor gatherings that:

a.    Help reinforce the commitment and enlistment decision of DEP/DTP members, and solicit referrals from them

and their guests.

b.    Enable recruiters to meet prospect guests, answer questions about Army opportunities and options, and interest

them in RA and USAR enlistment.

c.    Enable a prospect to meet with recently enlisted DEP/DTP members to discover why they decided to enlist.

d.    Provide DEP/DTP Family members support and recognition to help DEP/DTP retention.

e.    Foster a positive relationship with the DEP/DTP Family members and the Army.

6–2. Policy

a.             Procurement for DEP/DTP gatherings will comply with policies and procedures established by the servicing

procurement officer, in accordance with this regulation.

b.             A meal or refreshment period may be included incidental to the purpose of the DEP/DTP gathering, in accordance with 10 U.S.C. 520c. Funds will pay for meals, refreshments, and non-alcoholic beverages only, to include any gratuity and non-exempt tax. Functions will be carefully managed to minimize the expense of each.

c.             The number of USAREC military and DOD civilian hosts to the number of DEP/DTP members and their guests will not exceed the ratio of one to three for meal authorization. For example, there will not be more than 6 host meals provided when there are 18 DEP/DTP members and guests at a function. This limit does not apply to mini DEP/DTP functions that use recruiter-expense-allowance funds.

d.             The DEP/DTP member should be encouraged to bring guests to DEP/DTP functions on a one-time basis-such as eligible prospects, parents, a spouse or a girlfriend or boyfriend, or a close relative-who can have a favorable impact on recruiting. The DEP/DTP members may attend more than one function, but they should invite different guests.

e.             The DEP/DTP function may include recreational activities, but they must not include activities where DEP/DTP guests participate in physical activities. The DEP/DTP members who have voluntarily signed a physical training consent agreement may engage in noncontact team sports (such as, softball, touch or flag football, volleyball, basketball). The DEP/DTP personnel and guests will not be included in field or training exercises.

f.              Any DA military or civilian personnel required to participate in DEP/DTP functions may consume meals or refreshments provided as part of the function at no cost to such personnel. A TAIR participant may be involved in

DEP/DTP functions. Examples include skill demonstration team members scheduled to perform at DEP/DTP functions.

g.             If the presence of a DA military or civilian spouse is deemed essential to encourage DEP/DTP participation, or to provide the DEP/DTP spouse or Family member reinforcement, the meal or refreshment for the spouse will be provided at government expense. This is consistent with guidance in DODD 5500.7–R.

6–3. Program roles and procedures The USAREC:

a.      Determines where and how often DEP/DTP events are needed and the desired focus and outcome of each.

b.      Determines specific dates, sites, program agendas, and invitee mixes; designates the person to be in charge of the gathering.

c.      Coordinates the scheduling of TAIR and other presentation assets; arranges the no-cost site and facilities; funds

the meals, refreshments, and beverages; and arranges for photography, as appropriate.

d.      Sends formal letters to DEP/DTP invitees that encourage them to bring guests; ensures follow-up and feedback to

determine an accurate final meal count, to avoid excess meals.

e . P l a n s p u b l i c a f f a i r s c o v e r a g e o f D E P / D T P e v e n t s ; p r e p a r e s a n d d i s t r i b u t e s n e w s r e l e a s e s w i t h p h o t o s t o hometown newspapers, as appropriate.

f.     Reports immediate results of the DEP/DTP event, such as appointments made with guests and new leads for

follow-up.

g.    Ensures requests and approvals for DEP/DTP gatherings, and related documents, are filed electronically for 2

years after the event has occurred, and then the documents are destroyed.

Chapter 7

Hometown and Special Recruiter Assistance Program

7–1. Objectives

The objective of the Hometown Recruiter Assistance Program (HRAP) and the Special Recruiter Assistance Program (SRAP) is to support the Army’s belief that everyone has a responsibility to help the Army’s recruiting efforts and mission. This is accomplished by:

a.      Following the Chief of Staff of the Army’s guidance on Army support to recruiting.

b.      Allowing new Soldiers the opportunity to bridge the gap with America’s youth while telling their Army story in

their community.

c.      Allowing all Soldiers, both officers (commissioned/warrant) and enlisted, the opportunity to further reinforce the Army’s commitment to excellence.

d.      Allowing ARNG and USAR Soldiers the opportunity to participate in HRAP while on initial active duty for training (IADT) orders as designated by DCS, G–1. The participation of ARNG and USAR in HRAP will be allowed in support of special activities or events. ARNG and USAR Soldiers are not allowed to participate in HRAP or SRAP at any other time unless authorized by the DCS, G–1.

e.      Encouraging RA noncommissioned officers to participate in HRAP and SRAP, as a means to assist and

experience recruiting within USAREC.

7–2. Policy

a. The DCS, G–1 has overall responsibility for maintaining policy and procedures for these programs. b. The CG, HRC will—

(1)    Control personnel actions for HRAP and SRAP under this regulation.

(2)    Effectively promote these programs within the personnel community.

c. The commanding generals of Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC) and all ACOMs will—

(1)   Ensure all installations establish an HRAP and SRAP point of contact (POC) for processing electronic applications using the HRAP Web site: https://hrap.goarmy.com.

(2)   Educate commanders at all levels of the Army on these programs and their importance in the recruiting process.

(3)   Ensure all Soldiers receive a safety briefing prior to traveling to HRAP or SRAP duty location.

d. The CG, USAREC has overall responsibility for HRAP and SRAP and will;

(1)   Establish a program manager responsible for supervising and managing the HRAP and SRAP programs.

(2)   Educate commanders at all levels of the Army on these programs and their impact on recruiting missionachievement.

(3)   Publish supplemental guidance with respect to the operational and functional requirements internal to USAREC.

7–3. Hometown Recruiter Assistance Program and procedures

a.      Participation in HRAP is an exception to permissive temporary duty (PTDY) guidelines in AR 600–8–10. As an exception to AR 600–8–10, HRAP duty is authorized for PTDY, and HRAP participants may conduct public business. Volunteers who participate in the HRAP in a PTDY status are not authorized to claim reimbursement for travel expenses and per diem allowances for the period of PTDY.

b.      As an exception to AR 600–8–10, the first O–5/lieutenant colonel (or designated representative) in the Soldier’s

chain of command may approve PTDY for up to 14 days.

c.      Soldiers (RA (officer and enlisted)) who are currently on leave and meet the requirements in paragraph e, below, may be permitted to participate in HRAP. Under these circumstances, the approval authority is the recruiting battalion commander. The USAREC will not extend HRAP past the end date annotated on the original DA Form 31 (Request and Authority for Leave), block 10.

d.      Approval for HRAP duty for those classified as walk-in participants will be annotated on the DA Form 31 in the

same manner as described in this regulation for other participants.

e.      Soldiers must meet the following qualifications to participate in HRAP:

(1)          Volunteer to perform duty in a PTDY status at no cost to the government.

(2)          Be a high school graduate with a diploma.

(3)          Be an advanced individual training (AIT) graduate, one station unit training (OSUT) graduate, or an OfficerCandidate School graduate en route to the first duty assignment or at current assignment. An exception for USAR and ARNG Soldiers on IADT orders is provided in paragraph 7–1d, above.

(4)          Soldiers (officer and enlisted) serving in a CONUS assignment may participate in HRAP, providing they meetall other qualification criteria.

(5)          Soldiers must be familiar with the geographical area, have peer connections and influence (usually through highschool or college, local employment, civic organizations), and be able to contribute to the recruiting efforts in this area, to give them an optimum opportunity to help recruit.

(6)          Must reside within 50 miles of the recruiting station they are assigned to support and have personal or publictransportation available to and from the recruiting station.

(7)          Must not be under suspension of favorable personnel actions as an HRAP participant.

(8)          Have an approved DA Form 31 (ensure form and process is current) signed by the first O–5/LTC in theSoldier’s chain of command or designated representative. The TRADOC HRAP manager at initial entry training (IET) installations ensures that appropriate steps are taken to establish HRAP participation in conjunction with reporting dates to first duty assignment CONUS or outside the continental United States (OCONUS). TRADOC publishes supplemental guidance with respect to the operational and functional requirements to ensure maximum support of HRAP. The TRADOC Soldiers will receive a safety briefing from their parent unit prior to departure. f. For ACOM procedures:

(1)   Soldiers must meet all requirements of this regulation.

(2)   Soldiers must complete DA Form 31 and submit it through their chain of command.

(3)   The installation HRAP POC submits an electronic HRAP application. The local recruiting command companycommander reviews the record and approves, or disapproves, the request. The installation HRAP POC notifies the HRAP applicant of approval or disapproval and recruiting center assignment.

(4)   Established port call dates will not be changed to participate in HRAP.

(5)   Soldiers may voluntarily terminate their participation in the HRAP at any time and return or proceed to theirnormal or scheduled duty location.

(6)   The installation HRAP POC enters appropriate information to input or update the Soldier’s record in the HRAPWeb site. An electronic request will be submitted to the local recruiting company commander for review and approval / disapproval. Installation HRAP POCs can review the Soldier’s request status on the HRAP Web site.

(7)   Soldiers will receive a safety briefing from their parent unit prior to departure.

g. Duty requirements for Soldiers include:

( 1 ) S o l d i e r s w i l l r e p o r t t o t h e d e s i g n a t e d r e c r u i t i n g c e n t e r w i t h a p p r o v e d D A F o r m 3 1 o n t h e d a y H R A P commences.

(2)          Soldiers will perform multiple recruiting tasks to support the recruiting activities in and around the localrecruiting station. Soldiers will receive an in-brief from USAREC personnel on specific referral techniques and goals. Soldiers will understand that their goal is to raise awareness and assist in finding qualified prospects for enlistment and prospective officer and/or warrant officer candidates.

(3)          Soldiers work no more than 24 hours per week performing HRAP duties.

(4)          Soldiers hand carry DA Form 31 to the parent or gaining unit, to complete processing of PTDY and leave dates.This happens after the center leader has completed DA Form 31, block 17, by annotating HRAP duty start and end dates and signing to verify completion of HRAP participation, prior to releasing the Soldier. This ensures that Soldiers receive proper credit for PTDY and leave. Note: Duty periods are recorded in the HRAP database, and the HQ USAREC personnel are not required to maintain a residual copy of DA Form 31. h. Soldiers do not:

(1)    Drive applicants to military entrance processing station (MEPS) or medical appointments.

(2)    Run police or court record checks or requests for references.

(3)    Drive government-owned vehicles.

i. The recruiting center leader:

(1)   Updates electronic HRAP database within 48 hours of the projected arrival or departure. Arrival, departure, andproductivity data on each Soldier are entered in the HRAP database.

(2)   Makes maximum use of Soldiers within the community.

(3)   Briefs Soldiers on:

(a)    Duties and responsibilities.

(b)    Inappropriate relationships and prohibited activities with recruiting personnel, future Soldiers, and applicants.

(c)    The recruiting center’s chain of command and mission.

(d)    The basics of MEPS.

(e)    Basic lead-producing activities.

(f)     Recruiting improprieties, policies, and procedures.

(g)    Uniform Code of Military Justice jurisdiction (jurisdiction remains with the parent installation).

(4)          Reinforce the importance of Soldiers maintaining DA Form 31 for proper credit of HRAP duty and leave whenthey arrive at, or return to, the gaining or parent installation.

(5)          Evaluate Soldiers based on personal behavior and military bearing, and if necessary release Soldiers based on thefollowing reasons:

(a)    Soldier’s choice.

(b)    Medical evaluation, motivation, discipline, ineffectiveness of the Soldier.

(c)    Cancellation by the center leader.

j. Soldiers who have mandatory follow-on training after AIT (airborne training, air assault training): (1) Are eligible to perform a subsequent HRAP tour after completing mandatory follow-on training.

(2) Should be considered for this program while waiting for class start date, if time permits.

k. All HRAP applications will be submitted to the HRAP Web site.

(1) The IET (AIT/OSUT) Soldiers and special event participation as designated by DCS, G–1 are entered by

TRADOC installations and schools. The address for the HRAP Web site is https://hrap.goarmy.com (2) The USAREC personnel will enter all other HRAP applications, including walk-in volunteers.

(3) All others will be submitted by the recommending Army installation.

l.       The IET (AIT/OSUT) installation HRAP POC will request HRAP Web site access via email to usarmy.knox.

usarec.mbx.g3-hq-hrap@mail.mil.

m.    Officer participation in HRAP includes the following guidance:

(1)      Volunteer procedures are followed as stated in paragraph 7–3 of this regulation.

(2)      Officers coordinate directly with the recruiting company commander where they wish to perform HRAP in aPTDY status.

(3)      Recruiting company commanders determine the best way to use the officer during HRAP duty. Itinerary andduties will be commensurate with the officer’s grade.

(4)      Officers will be made aware that they are not authorized per diem while participating in HRAP.n. Duty procedures for officers:

(1)          Officers report to the designated duty location with approved DA Form 31 on the day HRAP commences.

(2)          Officers perform multiple recruiting tasks to support the recruiting activities in and around the assignedrecruiting area of operation.

(3)          Officers are briefed by USAREC personnel on specific referral techniques and goals. Officers understand thattheir goal is to raise awareness and help find qualified prospects for enlistment, as well as officer and/or warrant officer candidates.

(4)          Officers work no more than 24 hours per week performing HRAP duties.

(5)          Officers hand carry the DA Form 31 to parent or gaining unit to complete processing of PTDY and leave datesafter the company commander or center leader has completed DA Form 31, block 17. This is done by annotating HRAP start and end dates and signing to verify completion of HRAP participation prior to releasing officers. This ensures officers receive proper credit for PTDY and leave. Note: Duty periods are recorded in the HRAP database, and HQ USAREC personnel are not required to maintain a residual copy of DA Form 31.

o. Recruiting company commanders will:

(1)   Ensure that the electronic HRAP database is updated on all existing HRAP records and walk-participants within48 hours of the projected arrival/departure. Annotate arrival, departure, and productivity data on each HRAP participant in the HRAP Web site. The work of the HRAP Soldier must be captured and reflect any leads or contracts associated with the Soldier’s tour. Leads will be entered into the Army Recruiting Information Support System’s record or submitted via the Army Referral System at https://smart.goarmy.com.

(2)   Make maximum use of officers within the community.

(3)   Brief officers on:

(a)    Duties and responsibilities.

(b)    Inappropriate relationships and prohibited activities with recruiting personnel, future Soldiers and applicants.

p. Awards and recognition of HRAP participants: Commanders at all levels are encouraged to recognize outstanding performance. Soldiers may be recognized through local certificates of achievement and letters of appreciation for quality referrals made to recruiting personnel. Commanders may also forward recommendations (DA Form 638) for an impact military award to the Soldier’s unit for consideration.

7–4. Special Recruiter Assistance Program and procedures

a.         The CONUS and OCONUS Soldiers, both officers (commissioned/warrant) and enlisted, who have participated in a qualifying operation designated by HQDA (DAPE–MPA) may volunteer for the SRAP. This helps further reinforce the Army’s commitment to excellence.

b.         The Army believes that everyone is responsible for assisting the Army’s recruiting efforts and that this is

accomplished by:

(1)      Adhering to the Chief of Staff of the Army’s guidance on Army support to recruiting.

(2)      Allowing all Soldiers the opportunity to bridge the gap with America’s youth while telling their Army story intheir community.

(3)      Allowing Soldiers, officer and enlisted, the opportunity to reinforce the Army’s commitment to excellence.

(4)      Ensuring that Soldiers who are approved for SRAP return to their hometown or close proximity and help localrecruiting efforts by promoting “Army awareness” in the community through Soldier-centric activities. Soldiers must be familiar with the geographical area, have peer connections and influence (usually through high school or college, local employment, civic organizations, veterans organizations, and so on), and be able to contribute to the recruiting efforts in this area in order to give them an optimum opportunity to assist in local recruiting efforts.

c.          The SRAP participants will serve in a TDY status for a period up to 14 days and may claim reimbursement for travel expenses and per diem allowance for the period of TDY. The SRAP may be taken in conjunction with ordinary leave.

d.         Qualifications to participate in SRAP:

(1)          Being a volunteer for SRAP.

(2)          Having served in Operation Iraqi Freedom, Operation Enduring Freedom, or any qualifying operation designatedby HQDA.

(3)          Possessing skills necessary to effectively and comfortably communicate with individuals or groups aboutpersonal Army experiences.

e. Procedures:

(1)          Soldiers must submit their applications via email to: usarmy.knox.usarec.mbx.g3-hq-hrap@mail.mil.

(2)          The Headquarters, USAREC HRAP/SRAP manager will review and forward all requests to the RecruitingStandards Directorate and Security Branch to be screened for suitability prior to further consideration for this duty.

(3)          Soldiers who meet program requirements will be approved for duty and will be notified by the HQ USARECHRAP/SRAP manager through e-mail.

(4)          All approved Soldiers will submit a DA Form 4187 (Personnel Action) to the HQ USAREC HRAP/SRAPmanager, approved and signed by the first O–5/LTC in their chain of command authorizing participation. Soldiers will send their DA Form 4187, via e-mail to usarmy.knox.usarec.mbx.g3-hq-hrap Note: Soldiers not approved by their leadership must notify the HQ USAREC SRAP manager immediately, so that their application can be closed out. (5) Upon receipt of the approved and signed DA Form 4187, the HQ USAREC HRAP/SRAP manager will enter the Soldier’s information into the HRAP database and enter the Soldier’s Social Security number into the DTS, to associate the Soldier with the DTS SRAP line of accounting.

(6)          Soldiers will build a DTS authorization/order for SRAP duty using instructions provided by the HQ USARECSRAP manager. Soldiers are authorized rental cars and lodging. Soldiers may drive their privately owned vehicle to their duty location, but they will only be reimbursed the cost of airfare if the mileage cost exceeds the cost of a roundtrip ticket. Soldiers may be authorized daily in-and-around mileage not to exceed 20 miles per day. Soldiers must keep a daily log of destination and miles driven, and it must be scanned along with receipts when submitting their travel voucher at the completion of duty.

(7)          Units must approve all DTS requests for travel prior to the Soldier departing for duty to eliminate any travelissues.

(8)          Soldiers must receive a safety brief from their unit prior to departure for duty.

f. Duty processes for SRAP participants:

(1)          Soldiers report to the designated recruiting center leader on the day that SRAP duty commences, in Armycombat uniform. Soldiers must have a set of the Army Service Uniform for special events and media interviews, as appropriate or directed by the battalion/company commander or center leader.

(2)          Soldiers are authorized to use government-owned vehicles during duty hours to perform official duties, but theymust have a valid state driver’s license.

(3)          Soldiers work not less than 40 hours per week. These Soldiers will be sharing their Army story and findingqualified candidates for enlisted and officer/warrant officer opportunities.

(4)          Soldiers participate in:

(a)    Media events (news release, radio, newspaper; college and university visits and presentations, and so on).

(b)    Organizational events (national/local events, National Hot Rod Association, fairs, career days, and so on).

(c)    Gatherings for COIs and organized clubs (educators, local government, Chamber of Commerce, and so on). (d) The DEP/DTP functions.

(e) Other events as directed, ensuring maximum effectiveness of the Soldier’s activities. g. Recruiting center leaders:

(1)   Update the electronic HRAP database within 47 hours of the projected arrival or departure. They enter arrival,departure, and productivity data on each SRAP Soldier in the HRAP database.

(2)   Make maximum use of SRAP Soldiers within the community.

(3)   Brief SRAP Soldiers on:

(a)    Duties and responsibilities.

(b)    Recruiting center chain of command and mission.

(c)    Inappropriate relationships and prohibited activities with recruiting personnel, future Soldiers, and applicants. (d) The basics of MEPS.

(e)    Basic lead-producing activities.

(f)     Recruiting improprieties, policies, and procedures.

(g)    Uniform Code of Military Justice jurisdiction (jurisdiction remains with the parent installation).

h. Special Recruiter Assistance Program Soldiers are under the command and control of the local recruiting battalion commander during their tour of duty. This command and control may be delegated to the local recruiting company commander or center leader. The SRAP Soldiers will be evaluated based on personal behavior and military bearing, and if necessary release Soldiers based on the following reasons:

(1)    Soldier’s choice.

(2)    Medical evaluation, motivation, discipline, or ineffectiveness of the Soldier.

i. Awards and recognition of SRAP Soldiers: Commanders at all levels are encouraged to recognize outstanding performance. Soldiers may be recognized through local certificates of achievement and letters of appreciation for quality referrals made to recruiting personnel. Commanders may also forward recommendations (DA Form 638) for an impact military award to the Soldiers’ unit for consideration.

Chapter 8 Recruiting and Reserve Partnership Council

8–1. Objectives

The R2PC is a perpetual partnership forum that is designed to, improve communications and synchronize recruiting efforts between USAREC elements, supported USAR units, USACC detachments, and Army Reserve Careers Division (ARCD) personnel within their respective areas of operation. This effort is guided by HQ USAREC and the DCS, G–1. The ultimate goal of the R2PC is to build and sustain unit personnel strength and readiness.

8–2. Policy

a.             An R2PC will be convened annually at the recruiting brigade level, and semi-annually at the recruiting battalion level. Recruiting battalions covering large geographical areas should consider hosting additional R2PCs to meet the needs of the Army Reserve units supported. Multiple sessions would enable smaller group discussions and personal training between both the battalion and supported units. USAREC, MEDCOM, and USARC have established the medical recruiting enterprise zone (MREZ) as the means to synchronize medical recruiting efforts and partnerships. In lieu of the R2PC, USAREC medical recruiting battalions (MRBs) will coordinate with and participate in their supported MEDCOM Regional Medical Command’s (RMC’s) MREZ on a semi-annual basis. RMC commanders will sponsor the MREZ meetings, and USAREC MRBs will coordinate and submit MREZ agenda items, discussion points, and synchronization calendars to RMC commanders prior to the meeting.

b.             The annual recruiting brigade R2PC will be comprised of the recruiting brigade commander, subordinate recruiting battalion commanders, the MRB commander, USAR major subordinate commanders, and regional representatives from ARCD. Alignment of the USAR operational and functional commands may require their attendance at more than one R2PC, so recruiting battalions must coordinate. The MRB is not required to host R2PCs.

(1)          The R2PC dates must be confirmed, and members notified at least 90 days prior to the date of the recruitingbrigade R2PC. Schedules will be provided to the HQ staff at USARC and USAREC.

(2)          Representatives from HQ USAREC and HQ USARC will attend. Recruiting brigades will invite brigaderepresentatives from USACC.

(3)          The recruiting brigade commander and command sergeants major (CSMs) will host the R2PC. Attendance willinclude the recruiting battalion commanders and CSMs, Army Reserve major subordinate command commanders and CSMs, and regional representatives from ARCD.

c. The semiannual recruiting battalion R2PC will be hosted by the recruiting battalion commander and CSM. Recruiting company commanders and first sergeants (1SGs), supported USAR commanders, CSM, 1SGs, and ARCD personnel must attend. Medical Recruiting Battalion commanders and CSMs will host at least one R2PC annually and provide representatives at the line recruiting battalion R2PCs when possible. Participation by regional USACC commanders is encouraged.

(1)          The recruiting battalion R2PC will be convened at least semiannually (by fiscal year) or more frequently, asrequired. This will be mutually determined by the recruiting battalion, supported USAR commanders, and ARCD representatives. Care should be taken to ensure meetings are scheduled apart as evenly as practicable. The R2PC date must be confirmed and members notified at least 90 days prior to the date of the R2PC. Schedules will be provided to

HQ USAREC through the chain of command, and HQ USAREC will provide copies to HQ USARC (AFRC–PR).

(2)          A representative from the recruiting brigade will attend. HQ USAREC and HQ USARC representatives mayattend. Recruiting battalions will invite battalion representatives from USACC and ROTC units within their area of support.

(3)          Recruiting and USAR unit commanders must obtain written approval from the first O–6/colonel in the chain ofcommand to be excused from attending a battalion R2PC. Recruiting unit memorandums will be scanned and forwarded to the attention of USAR OPS, and Army Reserve unit memorandums will be scanned and forwarded to ARAccessions@USAR.ARMY.MIL.

(4)          The format for the battalion R2PC must encompass the importance of the recruiting mission, the severity of unitshortages, and ways to improve accessions.

(5)          The battalion R2PC will stress the required unified effort to develop a deliverable product that addresses boththe unit recruiting plan and the DTP training plans.

(6)          An optional format for the recruiting battalion R2PC involves break-out groups of USAR and USARECpersonnel to discuss and address local issues, and to collectively formulate courses of action to improve unit strength and enhance the recruiting effort.

(7)          Schedule councils preferably on Fridays, Saturdays, or in conjunction with battle assemblies or drills.

d.    Recruiting companies may also host R2PCs, above and beyond the battalion semiannual requirement, to bridge

the gap between battalion R2PCs.

e.    The USAR Operational, Functional, Training, and Support commands are responsible for funding travel for their

representatives to attend R2PCs.

8–3. Program roles and procedures

a. USAREC:

(1)   Monitors overall R2PC programs to ensure R2PCs are being conducted properly.

(2)   Provides R2PC schedules to the HQ USARC’s Personnel Directorate.

(3)   Provides assistance when requested.

(4)   Maintains file of all R2PC minutes and AAR comments; forward minutes and AAR comments to HQ USARC(AFRC–PR).

(5)   Coordinates to solve problems when the councils seek assistance.

b. Recruiting brigade commanders (excluding the MRBs) will:

(1)   Chair respective councils and coordinate council activities.

(2)   Convene a recruiting brigade R2PC annually in accordance with paragraph 8–2, above.

(3)   Monitor subordinate recruiting battalion R2PC issues and proceedings through review of their minutes and AARcomments.

(4)   Coordinate with USAR mission support commands (MSCs) to resolve issues when recruiting battalion R2PCseeks assistance.

(5)   Ensure minutes and AAR comments are forwarded to HQ USAREC and HQ USARC, (AFRC–PR).

(6)   Retain copies of recruiting brigade and recruiting battalion R2PC minutes and AAR comments for 2 years.c. Recruiting brigade operations officers:

(1)          Ensure minutes and AAR comments of recruiting brigade R2PC are recorded and published as information to theR2PC membership.

(2)          Ensure recruiting brigade R2PC minutes and AAR comments are submitted to HQ USAREC OperationsDirector- ate and the HQ USARC (AFRC–PR) (reports control exempt, AR 335–15).

(3)          Ensure recruiting brigade R2PC minutes and AAR comments are captured and submitted per guidance above,not later than 10 working days after the date of the meeting.

(4)          Review subordinate recruiting battalion R2PC minutes and AAR comments to ensure compliance with thisregulation.

(5)          Forward recruiting battalion minutes and AAR comments 5 working days after receipt.

d. Recruiting battalion commanders will:

(1)   Chair respective councils and coordinate council activities.

(2)   Convene a recruiting battalion R2PC biannually in accordance with paragraph 8–2c1, above.

(3)   Ensure minutes and AAR comments are recorded and published as information to R2PC members. Requiredentries on the minutes and AAR comments will be attendees, issues that were discussed, date, time, and place of the next meeting, and a minimum of 6 AAR comments; three sustain and three improve for the next meeting. Forward a copy of respective recruiting brigade HQ not later than 10 working days after the date of the meeting.

(4)   Retain R2PC minutes and AAR comments on file for 2 years.

e. The HQ USARC:

(1)          Monitors council issues and proceedings through review of the minutes and AAR comments published by thecouncils’ chairs.

(2)          Coordinates to solve problems when the council seeks assistance.

(3)          Provides a representative who is able to speak for the command in all matters brought before the council, asrequired.

8–4. Common areas of interest

a. Brigade R2PCs (as applicable):

(1)       Active Duty for Operational Support, Reserve Component (ADOS–RC).

(2)       REQUEST Vacancy System.

(3)       Local advertising support.

(4)       Impact of force structure changes on recruiting and USAR units.

(5)       Unit sponsorship and future Soldier training programs.

(6)       Compliance with regulations, policies and memorandums of agreement and understanding.

(7)       Special missions recruiting (health professionals, chaplain, warrant officer, and so on).

(8)       Training seat issues and scheduling of initial military training (IMT).

(9)       Reserve Soldiers enlisting in the Active Army.

(10)    Reserve Officers’ Training Corps/Simultaneous Membership Program (ROTC/SMP).

(11)    New or changed incentives and benefits.

(12)    New or changed USAR enlistment options.

(13)    Review previously discussed R2PC issues and due-outs.

(14)    Establish due-outs/deliverables.

(15)    Determine date, time, and place of next council.

(16)    Publish AAR and minutes of the R2PC.

b. Battalion R2PCs (as applicable):

(1)    Active Duty for Operational Support, Reserve Component (ADOS–RC).

(2)    REQUEST Vacancy System.

(3)    Local advertising support.

(4)    Location of recruiters and their association with specific USAR units.

(5)    Market analysis in relation to force structure changes; discuss the impact on recruiting and USAR units.

(6)    Unit recruiting plan.(a) Recruiting priorities.

(b)    ADOS program.

(c)    Significant recruiting events.

(d)    Unit marketing opportunities.

(e)    Integration of PaYS and/or USAR employer outreach program.

(f)     Future Soldier training.

(g)    Advertising plan.

(7)    Unit sponsorship programs; DTP.

(8)    Compliance with regulations, policies and memorandums of agreement and understanding.

(a)      Resolve issues or problems to ensure that both recruiting and USAR units are adhering to established regulations, policies.

(b)      Develop controls to sustain positive trends and overcome negative trends.

(9)       Healthcare professions recruiting.

(10)    Recruiting for hard-to-fill and old unit vacancies.

(11)    Training seat issues and scheduling of IMT.

(12)    Reserve Soldiers enlisting in the Active Army.

(13)    The ROTC/SMP.

(14)    New or changed USAR enlistment options.

(15)    Review previously solicited agenda items and due-outs.

(16)    AR commander’s feedback on enlistments and transfers.

(17)    HRC problems such as obtaining reenlistment eligibility codes and separation documents.

(18)    Promotion opportunities for recruits before IMT.

(19)    Identification of USAR personnel for involvement in the centers of influence programs.

(20)    Commitments between recruiting battalion and USAR feedback from battalion-level R2PCs.

(21)    Establish due-outs/deliverables.

(22)    Establish due-outs/deliverables.

c.             The brigade and battalion conducts and publishes an AAR upon completion of each R2PC. The R2PC plans, coordinates, and maintains supportive relationships between local recruiting organizations and the supported USAR units. Each R2PC resolves, to the fullest extent possible, issues that create adverse working relationships. Minutes and AAR comments of each meeting are recorded by the respective recruiting brigade or recruiting battalion. Included are a detailed summary of all attendees, items discussed, and AAR comments from the R2PC. AARs are used to document deficiencies in planning and execution of the R2PC. Requests for assistance along with concerns in clarification of the enlistment process communicated from USAR personnel are noted. Brigade and battalion leadership will document processes taken to rectify and satisfy these requests and will advise HQs USAREC G–3 no later than 30 from date of R2PC of processes resolved or underway. HQs USAREC will communicate additional requirements, and assist where necessary. The R2PC chair will forward copies of minutes and AAR comments to HQ USAREC and HQ USARC (personnel directorates).

d.             At every battalion R2PC, a unit recruiting plan is developed for each unit in attendance. This plan is back briefed

to the recruiting battalion commander and senior USAR commanders present.

e.             Recruiting brigade and recruiting battalion commanders chair and host the council. Representatives from supported USAR commands and units attend R2PCs. Council representatives of any participating command may request a special meeting of the R2PC.

f.              Most problems that surface through the councils are resolved quickly at the local level. If an issue is not resolved at recruiting battalion and USAR unit level, it should be quickly identified to the recruiting bridge/HQ USAREC or USAR MSC and HQ USARC level for resolution.

g.             Frequent informal sessions between USAR units, company or detachment commanders, and supporting recruiting

company and recruiting station commanders are encouraged to promote:

(1)    Synchronized recruiting effort.

(2)    Development of local recruiting programs.

(3)    Resolution of issues of local interest.

(4)    Early identification of issues that require attention of higher headquarters.

Chapter 9 Mission Support

9–1. Objectives

The Army Accessions governance structure cited below is established under the authority of the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (ASA(M&RA)), to provide mission support requirements across the Army’s three components, to accomplish the objectives below.

a.             It provides a governance structure to facilitate officer and enlisted accessions, and codifies forums for staff and senior leaders to develop and propose missions and programs, to resolve accession issues, and to provide transparency to the accession mission development process.

b.             The governance structure consists of nine formal forums, which establish an ongoing collaborative process to synchronize engagement, levels of service, and information flow among accession stakeholders. The nine forums are: The Multi-Component Accessions Working Group (MCAWG); the Army Acquire Portfolio Integrated Working Group; the Enlisted Incentives Review Board (EIRB); the Multi Component Incentives Review (MCEIR), the Accessions Council of Colonels; the Quarterly Officer Accession Review; the Accessions General Officer Steering Committee (GOSC), the Senior Management Forum for Accessions, and the monthly and quarterly Recruiting, Retention and Strength (RR&S) briefing to the Secretary of the Army (SECARMY).

9–2. Policy

a.             The Multi-Component Accession Working Group. The MCAWG meets monthly and is hosted by the Director, Military Personnel Management (DMPM). Participants are representatives of ASA(M&RA); DMPM, Enlisted Accessions Division (DAPE–MPA), Officer Division (DAPE–MPO), Enlisted Career Systems Division (DAPE–MPE), and Training Requirements Division (DAPE–MPT); Army G–3/5/7; ARNG; OCAR; TRADOC, USAREC; USACC, and HRC. The MCAWG discusses accessions mission development and accessions related issues. The MCAWG members participate in weekly or monthly conference calls, as needed, to discuss accessions mission letter development, to prepare for the monthly MCAWG meeting. The MCAWG develops and recommends fiscal year accession mission requirements and presents them annually to the DMPM no later than 30 September of the year prior to execution.

b.             The Acquire Portfolio Integrated Working Group. The APIWG’s mission is to coordinate the integration of systems and operational changes, to identify, resolve, and improve the effectiveness of the Army’s accessioning capability. This ensures the Army is adaptable to an evolving accessions and technical environment. The APIWG meets quarterly, at a minimum, and is hosted by the DMPM. Representatives of all functional/technical organizations, systems, and subject matter from across the Army’s components, and from the activities listed in paragraphs (1) through (3) below, participate in the APIWG. The Group primarily focuses on streamlining, improving accessioning IT capability to include critical interfaces, and Human Resource systems data exchange and processes. It consolidates technical working groups to leverage mission coordination necessary for Army systems modernization. It also facilitates and improves effectiveness of cross system collaboration and data synchronization, to reduce duplicated or redundant software development. The APIWG improves efficiency in all accessioning systems by ensuring cross system visibility and sharing for data and resources. It modernizes and streamlines required business process to meet the requirements of ongoing change in policy or law.

(1)          The APIWG’s functional members are: HRC Reserve Systems; Accessions Management Branch; PersonnelInformation Systems Directorate, Officer Personnel Management Directorate, Enlisted Personnel Management Directorate, and TAGD; from ARNG G–1 (Guard Strength Maintenance Division; Guard Incentives; Personnel Policy Division; and Human Resource Manpower Division); Army Reserve G–1; Army Reserve Careers Division and USARC; USACC; USAREC G–3/G–6 (Chaplain, AMEDD); U.S. Military Academy; The Judge Advocate General; and the DMPM (Accessions Division; Enlisted Careers Division; Military Personnel Training Division, and Military Personnel Officer’s Division)).

(2)          The APIWG’s primary technical members represent systems within USAHRC: the Personnel InformationSystems Directorate (office symbol USAHRC–CIOSD), KEYSTONE Systems, Army Accessions Enterprise (AAE) Army Recruiting Information Support System, the Cadet Command Information Management Module, REQUEST, and the Army Training Requirements and Resources System.

(3)          Adjunct technical members are the Defense Management Data Center, the Integrated Total Army PersonnelDatabase (ITAPDB); Total Army Personnel Database-Guard (TAPDB–G); Total Army Personnel Database Enlisted/ Officer (TAPDB–AE/AO); Total Army Personnel Database-Reserve (TAPDB–R), Intercomponent Data Transfer and all critical subsystems; the Defense Finance and Accounting System; the Joint Personnel Adjudication System; the Interactive Personnel Electronic Records Management System, the Integrated Personnel and Pay System, Retention Total Army Information Network, U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command’s USMEPCOM Integrated Resource System (MIRS and its follow on systems); Electronic Military Personnel Office; Enlisted Distribution and Assignment System; Total Officer Personnel Management Information System; National Guard Standard Installation and Division Personnel Reporting System (SIDPERS); U.S. Army Reserve Regional Level Application Software, and the Reserve Component Management System-Reserve.

c.             The Enlistment Incentives Review Board. The EIRB meets quarterly and is hosted by the DMPM. Participants are representatives of USAHRC, Army Budget Office (ABO), Army Marketing and Research Group (AMRG), USAREC, DCS G–1, NGB, and OCAR. This forum is used to evaluate current and proposed Active Component incentives programs and to ensure the three components are aligned in their enlisted recruiting incentives. The EIRB ensures that RA enlistment bonuses and other incentives are properly managed and used to effectively recruit the Soldiers in the specialties needed to maintain the Army’s strength. The EIRB is primarily an administrative process used by the Army to formulate incentives policies, to adhere to budgetary limits, and to develop the RA enlistment incentives program. The Director for Military Personnel Management approves the recommendations of the EIRB.

d.             The Multi Component Enlisted Incentives Review. The MCEIR meets quarterly and is hosted by the DMPM. Participants are representatives of USAHRC, ABO, AMRG, USAREC, Army G1, NGB and OCAR. The MCEIR reviews incentives across the Army’s Reserve Components (RC). The group analyzes and recommends adjustments to the application and level of RC enlistment incentives, in order to meet manpower requirements and recruiting objectives. Meanwhile, the MCEIR also ensures that incentives policies are consistent between the USAR and ARNG, within statutory constraints. Members exchange ideas and develop fair, cross-component incentives programs considering component-unique, mission-specific considerations to promote a unified Army recruiting incentives effort. The Director, ARNG and the Chief, Army Reserve will approve any recommendations of the MCEIR.

e.             The Accessions Council of Colonels. This group meets monthly and is hosted by the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs (PDASA (M&RA)) for Military Personnel. Participants include representatives from: the DCS, G–1, DMPM, USAREC, USACC, USAR, NGB, AMRG, and USAHRC. The meetings focus on current recruiting pilots, programs, and policies with an emphasis on resolving recruitment issues during the year of execution.

f.              The Quarterly Officer Accessions Review. The OAR meets quarterly and is hosted by the DMPM. Participants are representatives of ASA (M&RA), DCS, G–1, TRADOC, USACC, USAREC, USAHRC, USAR, ARNG, AMRG,

Officer Candidate School, U.S. Military Academy, Office of the Surgeon General, The Judge Advocate General, Office of the Chief of Chaplains, and U.S. Army Special Operations Command. The OAR is used to clear the path for the DCS, G–1 and officer accession stakeholders to monitor officer accession mission production, trends, and issues. It provides a forum for enterprise transparency, and information it gathers will inform the ASA(M&RA) and the DCS, G–1 on accession issue resolution, cohort shaping, and/or allocation or reallocation of resources to shape, in the near and long term Army Officer Corps inventories by using accessions. The OAR is intended to create synergy across the Army Officer Accession enterprise and to be the central tool used to synchronize near and long term goals with accessions initiatives. The OAR is a communication conduit between the ASA(M&RA), DCS, G–1, and the organizations responsible for recruiting, training, developing, appointing, and accessing officers into the force.

g.             The Senior Management Forum for Accession. The SMFA meetings are conducted monthly (except for December and during months in which the RR&S is conducted). Participants are the DCS, G–1; DMPM; PDASA (M&RA) Military Personnel; CG, USAREC; CG, USACC; Chief, Army Reserve; Director, ARNG; Director, AMRG; and TRADOC’s deputy commanding general. The conference call or meeting should normally be held the second week of the month and discuss the past month’s recruiting achievement, recruiting concerns and any additional senior leader issue pertaining to mission accomplishment or resourcing.

h.             The Accessions General Officer Steering Committee. The GOSC is an informal meeting in addition to the SMFA, as needed, between the DMPM; CAR; Director, ARNG; CG, USAREC; and CG, USACC. They discuss proposed changes to the annual mission, changes in policy that affect accession programs, and they review recruiting trends prior to briefing the SECARMY at the RR&S.

i.              The Recruiting, Retention, and Strength briefing. The RR&S briefing to the SECARMY is held monthly or quarterly, at the SECARMY’s direction. The Enlisted Accessions Branch in DMPM coordinates with participants to brief the SECARMY on component recruiting and retention achievements that occurred during the past month or quarter, as appropriate. Key attendees include (but are not limited to): SECARMY, Under Secretary of the Army; Deputy Under Secretary of the Army; ASA(M&RA); Assistant Secretary of the Army for Financial Management and

Comptroller; Chief of Staff of the Army; Vice Chief of Staff of the Army; Sergeant Major of the Army; Director of the

Army Staff; Director, AMRG; DCS, G–1; The Inspector General; The Judge Advocate General; U.S. Military

Academy Superintendent; Director, ARNG; Chief, Army Reserve; Chief of Public Affairs; Chief of Legislative Liaison; Chief of Chaplains; DCS G–3/5/7; DCS G–4; DCS, G–8; CG, USAHRC; CG, USAREC; CG, USACC; DMPM; and the PDASA (M&RA) for Military Personnel.

9–3. Leader execution

a. The DMPM will:

(1)          Participate in the Accessions Council of Colonels, the SMFA, and the Accessions GOSC.

(2)          Ensure the DMPM Enlisted Accessions Division conducts weekly or monthly mission letter conference calls toprepare for the monthly MCAWG and to coordinate mission letter changes and draft the annual Accession Mission Letter.

(3)          Plan and execute the quarterly RR&S update briefing. Host the MCAWG, the EIRB, the MCEIR, the APIWG,and the OAR.

(4)          Review and approve the fiscal year Accession Mission Letter no later than 30 September of the year prior toexecution.

(5)          Approve any initiatives or concerns related to accessioning submitted by the MCAWG and when appropriate;forward matters to the DCS, G–1 or ASA(M&RA) for action.

b. The CG, USAREC will:

(1)          Ensure USAREC participation in the weekly and monthly mission letter conference calls, the AccessionsCouncil of Colonels, the SMFA, the Accessions GOSC, the EIRB, the MCEIR, the APIWG, the MCAWG, the OAR, and the RR&S.

(2)          Submit RA and USAR accession reports and mission changes in accordance with DMPM guidelines andsuspense dates.

(3)          Prepare RA and USAR recruiting mission achievement slides and present them at the monthly and quarterlyRR&S Brief.

(4)          Elevate accession related initiatives and concerns to the MCAWG, or as appropriate.c. The CG, USACC will:

(1)          Ensure USACC participation in the Accessions Council of Colonels, the SMFA, the Accessions GOSC, theAPIWG, and the RR&S.

(2)          Prepare Cadet Command mission achievement and issue slides, and present them at the monthly and quarterlyRR&S Brief.

(3)          Elevate accession-related initiatives and concerns as appropriate.

(4)          The Director, ARNG will:

(5)          Ensure ARNG participation in the weekly and monthly mission letter conference calls, the Accessions Councilof Colonels, the SMFA, the Accessions GOSC, the EIRB, the MCEIR, the APIWG, the MCAWG, the OAR, and the RR&S.

(6)          Submit ARNG accession reports and requests for mission changes, in accordance with the DCS, G–1, DMPM’sguidelines and suspense dates.

(7)          Prepare ARNG recruiting mission achievement slides, and present them at the monthly and quarterly RR&SBrief.

(8)          Elevate accession related initiatives and concerns to the MCAWG, or as appropriate.d. The CAR will:

(1)      Ensure OCAR participation in the weekly and monthly mission letter conference calls, the Accessions Council ofColonels, the SMFA, the Accession GOSC, the EIRB, the MCEIR, the APIWG, the MCAWG, the OAR, and the RR&S.

(2)      Submit USAR requests for mission changes in accordance with the DCS, G–1, DMPM’s guidelines andsuspense dates.

(3)      Prepare USAR recruiting issue slides and present them at the monthly and quarterly RR&S Brief.

(4)      Elevate accession related initiatives and concerns to the MCAWG, or as appropriate.

e. The CG, TRADOC will:

(1)             Ensure TRADOC HQ participation in the Accessions Council of Colonels, the SMFA, the MCAWG, the OAR,and the RR&S.

(2)             Elevate accession related initiatives and concerns to the MCAWG, or as appropriate.f. The Director, AMRG will:

(1)      Ensure participation in the Accessions Council of Colonels, the SMFA, the EIRB, the MCEIR, the APIWG, theMCAWG, the OAR, and the RR&S.

(2)      Elevate accession-related initiatives and concerns to the MCAWG, or as appropriate.

g. The PDASA (M&RA) for Military Personnel will:

(1)    Participate in the SMFA, the Accession GOSC, the EIRB, the MCEIR, the APIWG, the MCAWG, the OAR,and the RR&S.

(2)    Host the Accessions Council of Colonels.

(3)    Elevate accession related initiatives and concerns to the MCAWG, or as appropriate.h. The CG, HRC will—

(1)      Ensure USAREC participation in the weekly and monthly mission letter conference calls, the AccessionsCouncil of Colonels, the EIRB, the MCEIR, the APIWG, the MCAWG, the OAR, and the RR&S.

(2)      Elevate accession related initiatives and concerns to the MCAWG, or as appropriate.

Appendix A References

Section I Required Publications

AR 15–39

Department of the Army Intergovernmental and Intragovernmental Committee Management Program (Cited in para 1–9d.)

AR 25–55

The Department of the Army Freedom of Information Act Program (Cited in para “Applicability” on page i.)

AR 335–15

Management Information Control System (Cited in para 8–3c(2).)

AR 340–21

The Army Privacy Program (Cited in para “Applicability” on page i.)

AR 600–8–10

Leaves and Passes (Cited in para 7–3a.)

DFAS–IN Regulation 37–1

Army Accounting Guidance and Fund Control (Cited in para 2–3l.)

Section II Related Publications

A related publication is a source of additional information. The user does not have to read it to understand this publication.

AR 11–2

Managers’ Internal Control Program

AR 135–200

Active Duty for Missions, Projects, and Training for Reserve Component Soldiers

AR 215–1

Military Morale, Welfare, and Recreation Programs and Nonappropriated Fund Instrumentalities (Cited in para 1–9r.)

AR 600–8–105

Military Orders

AR 601–208

Recruiting/Reenlistment Advertising Program

DODD 5500.7

Standards of Conduct

JFTR

Joint Federal Travel Regulations

31 USC 1517

Prohibited obligations and expenditures

Section III Prescribed Forms

This section contains no entries.

Section IV Referenced Forms

"Unless otherwise indicated, DA forms are available on the APD web site (www.apd.army.mil) and DD forms are available on the OSD web site (http://www.dtic.mil/whs/directives/infomgt/forms/)."

DA Form 11–2

Internal Control Evaluation Certification

DA Form 31

Request and Authority for Leave

DA Form 2028

Recommended Changes to Publications and Blank Forms

DA Form 4187

Personnel Action

Appendix B Internal Control Evaluation

B–1. Function

The function covered by this evaluation is the administration of the internal control process.

B–2. Purpose

The purpose of this evaluation is to assist unit managers and internal control administrators (ICAs) located at recruiting battalions and brigades in evaluating the key internal controls for DEP/DTP and E/COI events funding. It is not intended to cover all controls.

B–3. Instructions

Answers must be based on the actual testing of key internal controls (for example, document analysis, direct observation, sampling, simulation, other). Answers that indicate deficiencies must be explained and corrective action indicated in supporting documentation. These key internal controls must be formally evaluated at least once every 5 years. Certification that this evaluation has been conducted must be accomplished on DA Form 11–2 (Internal Control Evaluation Certification).

B–4. Test questions

a.    Is there local internal control guidance that defines internal control responsibilities and required actions?

b.    Are managers and ICAs trained in, and do they understand, their internal control responsibilities?

c.    Are explicit statements of internal control responsibility included in performance agreements for commanders and

managers down to accessible unit manager level?

d.    Is an internal control plan established and maintained to describe how key internal controls will be evaluated over

a 5-year period?

e.      Are internal control evaluations conducted in accordance with the internal control plan and prompt action taken to

correct any internal control weaknesses detected?

f.       Is the senior responsible official advised of potential material weaknesses detected through internal control

evaluations or from other sources?

g.      Are fund control logs being maintained by recruiting battalions or brigades?

h.      Are expenditures for the DEP/DTP functions, Recruiting and Reserve Partnership Council meetings and E/COI

events approved prior to the function?

i.       Are approved expenditures for DEP/DTP functions, Recruiting and Reserve Partnership Council meetings and E/ COI events supported by receipts?

B–5. Supersession

This evaluation replaces the evaluation for “Financial Management/Internal Controls-Section 2” previously published in DA Circular 11–89–1.

B–6. Comments

Help to make this a better tool for evaluating internal controls. Submit comments to: Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (SAFM–FOM), 109 Army Pentagon, Washington DC 20310–0109.

Glossary

Section I Abbreviations

1SG

first sergeant

AAR

after action report

ABO

Army Budget Office

ACOM

Army Command

ADOS

Active Duty Operation Support

AIT

advanced individual training

AMEDD

Army Medical Department

AMRG

Army Marketing and Research Group

AOC

areas of concentration

APIWG

Acquire Portfolio Integrated Working Group

ARCD

Army Reserve Careers Division

ARNG

Army National Guard

ARNGUS

Army National Guard of the United States

ASA(M&RA)

Assistant Secretary of the Army (Manpower and Reserve Affairs)

ASVAB

Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery

CASA

Civilian Aides to the Secretary of the Army

CAR

Chief, Army Reserve

CG

commanding general

COI

centers of influence

CONUS

continental United States

CSM

command sergeant major

DA

Department of the Army

DAPE–

For office symbols, see section III, below

DAT

Dental Admission Test

DCS, G–1

Deputy Chief of Staff, G–1

DEP

Delayed Entry Program

DFAS–IN

Defense Finance and Accounting Service, Indianapolis

DMPM

Director, Military Personnel Management

DOD

Department of Defense

DODD

Department of Defense directive

DTP

Delayed Training Program

DTS

Defense Travel System

E/COI

Educator/Centers of Influence

EIRB

Enlistment Incentives Review Board

FOA

field operating agency

GOSC

Accessions General Officer Steering Committee

HQ

Headquarters

HQDA

Headquarters, Department of the Army

HRAP

Hometown Recruiter Assistance Program

HRC

Human Resources Command

IADT

initial active duty for training

ICDT

Intercomponent Data Transfer

IET

initial entry training

IMT

initial military training

LTC

lieutenant colonel

MCAT

Medical College Admission Test

MCAWG

Multi Component Accessions Working Group

MCEIR

Multi Component Enlisted Incentives Review

MEPS

military entrance processing station

MOS

military occupational specialty

MRB

medical recruiting battalion

MSC

mission support command

MREZ

Medical Recruiting Enterprise Zone

NCO

noncommissioned officer

NGB

National Guard Bureau

OAR

Officer Accessions Review

OCAR

Office of the Chief, Army Reserve

OCONUS

outside continental United States

OSUT

one station unit training

PaYS

Partnership for Youth Success

PDASA(M&RA)

Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Manpower and Reserve Affairs

POC

point of contact

PTDY

permissive temporary duty

R2PC

Recruiting and Reserve Partnership Council

RA

Regular Army

RC

Reserve Components

REQUEST

Recruit Quota System

RMC

Regional Medical Command

ROTC

Reserve Officers’ Training Corps

RR&S

Recruiting, Retention and Strength

SECARMY

Secretary of the Army

SES

Senior Executive Service

SIDPERS

National Guard Standard Installation and Division Personnel Reporting System

SMFA

Senior Management Forum for Accession

SMP

Simultaneous Membership Program

SRAP

Special Recruiter Assistance Program

TAIR

Total Army Involvement in Recruiting

TDY

temporary duty

TRADOC

U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command

USACC

U.S. Army Cadet Command

USAHRC

U.S. Army Human Resources Command

USAR

United States Army Reserve

USARC

U.S. Army Reserve Command

USAREC

U.S. Army Recruiting Command

USC

United States Code

USMEPCOM

U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command

Section II Terms

Army awareness campaign

A secondary recruiting support campaign intended to promote understanding of the Army by the general public through participation in public events by Army promotional assets.

Army recruiting force

All recruiting elements of USAREC, ARNG, and USAR.

Awareness activities

Activities designated to create a favorable impression of the Army, such as skills demonstrations, and participation in parades or other events.

Centers of influence

Individuals or groups who can help develop a better image of the Army, influence individuals to enlist in an Army program, or refer names of leads to Army recruiters. They can be civic or business leaders, educators, members of professional groups, groups of high school or college students identified as class leaders or influencers, news media representatives, nurses, convention officials, or other influential individuals or groups.

Gaining chain of command

Chain of command that Soldier is to report to, as it is published on his permanent change of station orders.

General Officer Recruiting Support Program

A program to increase general officer involvement in recruiting activities by inviting general officers and other senior Army leaders to support each recruiting battalion activities where they can have a positive impact on the recruiting environment. Support activities include participating in recruiting battalion training conferences, community activities and DEP/DTP events, addressing civic organizations, high school and/or college events, business and community leaders and influencing area community and business leaders to support local recruiting efforts.

Leads

Information pertaining to prospects for Army enlistment. Leads should contain a name and address or phone number of a potential recruit.

Promotional assets

Any asset which has the potential of generating leads and creating increased awareness of opportunities available in the Total Army such as skill clinics, equipment displays, and speakers.

Parent chain of command

Chain of command that approved HRAP permissive TDY.

Prospect

An individual who has indicated interest in an enlistment or commission through face-to-face or telephonic contact, or COI, DEP/DTP member or hometown recruiter aide referral.

Prospect campaign

The main campaign directed under the TAIR program. This campaign is intended to reach the primary audience and increase enlistments of high school diploma graduate and high school senior accessions into the DEP and DTP by placing Army promotional assets in high schools and colleges.

Total Army Involvement in Recruiting Program Manager

Any individual in USAREC who manages the TAIR program on a daily basis and is directly involved with funding and coordination of TAIR events and providing information pertinent to the TAIR program as required. TAIR projects, by category, are the following: 1) Army parachute team projects. Projects involving presentations made by members of Army parachute teams in high school and college classrooms. Army precision parachuting team demonstrating at large public gatherings such as pro-football games and other national interest level events. 2) Bands. Elements from Army bands conducting skill clinic presentations at high schools and colleges, or skill auditions with prospects interested in the band MOS. Band concerts or marching bands or combos employed to perform in-house concerts or march and perform in public events or high schools. This category also includes Army choral groups. 3) Drill teams and ceremonial units. Elements of the Army Drill Team or ceremonial units which conduct skill clinic demonstrations at high schools and colleges. Army drill teams, historical cavalry units, or color guards marching in public events or high schools. Includes posting of the colors at sports and other ceremonial type activities. 4) MOS skill clinics. Skill team presentations to prospects in high school and college classrooms. These may consist of one Army sourced military language instructor from the Defense Language Institute visiting a high school or college foreign language classroom. These projects may also include showing and demonstrating easily transportable equipment that can be taken into the classroom. 5) Sports clinics. Contingents from Army sports teams presenting sports skill demonstrations to prospects at high schools and colleges. These teams include individuals recognized by officials from installation recreation and sports activities office who possess above average sport skills. Such projects draw the attention of prospects to the Army with recruiters present to answer Army career opportunity questions. Contingents from Army sports teams performing as a special attraction at national interest level public events such as pro-football games. 6) Exhibits and displays. Army displays, such as communications equipment, radar equipment, and vehicles as well as ACOM equipment, exhibits or displays placed on the grounds of high schools and colleges. Manned static Army displays at fair grounds or other similar public festivals. 7) General officer speakers. RA and USAR general officers (includes CASA) addressing high school seniors or graduates and college students. RA and USAR general officers (includes CASA) also addresses civic organizations and other COI groups. 8) Installation orientation tours. One day informational guided tours for RA and USAR prospects at Army installations and activities which highlight Army skill opportunities, equipment and training.

Total Army Involvement in Recruiting

Recurring and continued involvement of the entire Army supporting the U.S. Army recruiting effort by providing personnel and equipment for use in promotional activities.

Total Army Involvement in Recruiting unit support coordinator

Any individual at supporting unit level who is responsible for coordinating the scheduling and funding of TAIR projects with USAREC activities and other elements of the supporting unit.

U.S. Army Recruiting Command, Hometown Recruiter Assistance Program Manager

Any individual in USAREC who manages the HRAP and SRAP program on a daily basis and is directly involved with coordination of HRAP participants and providing information pertinent to the HRAP program as required.

Section III Special Abbreviations and Terms

DAPE–MPA

Enlisted Accessions Division

DAPE–MPE

Enlisted Career Systems Division

DAPE–MPO

Officer Division

DAPE–MPT

Training Requirements Division


                                                                           UNCLASSIFIED                  PIN 053846–000